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  • RAILROADS | bartletthistory

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  • School history | bartlett NH | school house history

    Share Schools In Bartlett. Schools Page 1 Schools Page 2 Back in the "old days" the students were not brought to the school...the school was brought to the student. In 1897 Bartlett had six schools so most students were within a couple of miles of "their" school. From town report for the fiscal year ending February 27, 1897, No. 1 - Lower Bartlett; No. 2 - Glen; No. 3 - Garland Ridge No. 4 - Kearsarge; No. 5 - Hill Town; No. 6 - Goodrich Falls We assume that each of the district school houses was of the one-room variety in 1897. Four of the one-room school houses in these districts are depicted on the afghan (pic below): Lower Bartlett, Glen, Garland Ridge and Goodrich Falls. No. 1 - Lower Bartlett - The Intervale (Lower Bartlett) School, the only one-room school still in existence, is now a private residence. It is located on Route 16A in the Intervale area of Bartlett. That school was replaced with the Intervale Grammar School, built in 1938. This school educated the children of Intervale, Glen and Goodrich Falls until its closing in the late 1950s. That building, located in the lower left corner of the afghan (pic. below), still exists and now houses the Bartlett Town Hall and Town Offices. No. 2 - Glen - The Glen School was located on Route 302 approximately halfway between the Massa Schussers Ski Club and Jericho Road. It appears on the afghan thanks to Vivian Robinson Eastman and Isabelle Dana Crouse, who described the building as they recalled it when they attended school there. No. 3 - Garland Ridge - The Garland Ridge School was located along Stony Brook, which is located between the Attitash Ski Area and Roger’s Crossing, (the railroad crossing east of Bartlett Village). Thanks to Jean Garland, who provided us with an old photograph from the Library files, we were able to sketch a likeness of that one-room school house for the afghan. ​ ​ No. 4 - Kearsarge - The Kearsarge School was located on what is now known as Hurricane Mountain Road, approximately half way between Mt. Surprise Road and Timberline Road. In the late 1800s the building is said to have been moved across the street into Conway, and Bartlett paid Conway tuition for the Kearsarge children to attend school there. This arrangement was continued until the 1930s. A time-worn photograph of this school is located in the history files at the Bartlett Library. No. 5 - Hill Town - The Hill Town District is located on West Side Road, approximately two miles east of the Route 302/West Side Road intersection. (more info HILL TOWN ). All that remains of that settlement is an old graveyard and the evidence of a few of the homes. The descendants of Brian Hill and Priscilla Drown Ward, early settlers of that area, still live in Bartlett. According to the 1897 report, $15.00 was expended to move the old school and $331.96 for labor and materials was expended to build a new school in the Hill District. Unfortunately, we were unable to locate a photo of either of these buildings for the 2008 afghan. No. 6 - Goodrich Falls - The Goodrich Falls School was located on old Route 16 just south of the home formerly owned by the McGraw family. We now have a pretty good idea of school days at Goodrich Falls, thanks to Marion Morton Randall, quite possibly the last known person, now living, to attend that school. Special District No. 5 - Bartlett Village - Bartlett Village Grammar School (located in the upper right-hand corner of the afghan) was built circa 1880, renovated in 1896 and burned in February 1931. The building was replaced with another in 1932. That building, titled Bartlett Grammar/High School is located in the upper right corner on the afghan. ​ ​ ​ Bartlett High School was built circa 1922-23, and is located in the upper left corner of the afghan and called Bartlett High/Grammar School. It served in that capacity until circa 1949, when it became the grammar school. The high school moved into the grammar school building and was located there until its closing in 1958. ​ Intervale School Demo 2014 This photo is captioned, "The Glen School". The large building appears to be the church so I assume the shack like building is the school. ? Any thoughts dear reader ??? The society commissioned an afghan blanket that featured the historic Bartlett Schoolhouses, pictured below. Six of the schoolhouse images on this afghan no longer exist, two still exist but as other than schools, and the center medallion represents the current school. Schools in Bartlett - More Details THE OLD BARTLETT SCHOOL HOUSE on HURRICANE MOUNTAIN ROAD One of our 2018 Newsletters featured an article about this little remembered school on Hurricane Mountain Road, now a private residence. Thank you, BHS Board Director, J. Hadley Champlin & BHS Advisor, Anne Pillion for writing this story. Scroll down to page 6 to begin the story. (Link opens in a new window) Hurrican Mountain Road School This Postcard is the Bartlett High School in the mid 1920's. Good luck deciphering the handwriting. This photo is the Bartlett Elementary and Junior High School in the early 1960's. There was a gymnasium on the upper floor. Catholic Church and the Dudley house are on this side of railroad tracks. The Bellerose house is across the railroad tracks.. Schools Page 1 Schools Page 2 In the early years education did not rank very high in the priorities settlers assigned to surviving life in the wilderness. The general consensus was that there was not money, time or manpower to educate children. When Josiah Bartlett became Governor in 1805 he encouraged the State Legislature to enact School Districting, which essentially forced all of the State's communities to provide for the education of its populace. The State provided some funding for each district based on which ones needed it most, but the funding was never sufficient to cover all the costs. In the case of Bartlett, with its six districts, the voters were constantly arguing over how to divide up the funds. Raising tax money for schools was always a very difficult task and the tax collector had his work cut out for him to persaude folks to actually pay the taxes. In 1812 the town residents vetoed a proposal to raise $25 for wood to heat the school buildings and instead, each scholor would furnish his proportional share of the wood by his own labor for the ensuing winter. Most students had to travel a long distance to get to the schools and the method of transportation was entirely up to their own devices. In one case a "school-bus" was designed that consisted of a hollowed out pine log, painted blue. about twelve small children could be huddled into it and it was towed by horses or oxen. Even by 1860 the Carroll County Commissioners characterized most of the school buildings as miserable shanties or shabby huts. The endurance of these early settlers is emphasized by todays standards where a student is not expected to walk much further than the end of his own driveway and if heat cannot be provided then the school is closed. If a student were asked to bring his own fuel to heat the school there would certainly be an uprising! The Shield was the High School Newsletter. 1958 marked the last graduating class. In 1959 the High School students were bussed to Kennett High School in Conway. This text was included in this issue of the Shield: School, by John Chandler Mr. Chandler attended Bartlett High School in the 1920's This article was written in the 1950's During the period during which the U.S. was developed considerable interest in providing educational facilities for students seeking high school diplomas. A few had been fortunate enough to avail themselves of higher education at schools in Conway, North Conway, Gorham (N.H.) and in Fryeburg and Portland, Me. After very careful planning, and having dredged all obvious alternatives, a small group of persons banded together to establish a two year high school. It was housed in the precinct building in Bartlett Village and a teacher was engaged to conduct classes in the subjects essential to meet State secondary schools standards. The first classes were held in September of 1922 , with 20 students enrolled. The teacher selected for this project was William Hounsell of Conway . This proved to be a very wise choice. He was an excellent teacher and was able to maintain discipline in difficult situations. He did a fine job in preparing the students for the final two years of high school. In September of 1924, a four year High School was established with a new building (part of the elementary school) and with William Hounsell as principal. The student body was made up mostly of underclassmen. Senior students were very limited in number. Inability of the older students to attend other schools after the two year program caused a spin-off into the job market and left only two potential senior students. When school opened in September, only one senior was enrolled. The other, (myself), having been elected captain of football at Kennett High School, and wishing to avail himself of this experience, decided to remain at Kennett . The situation changed when Christmas vacation rolled around and it appeared possible for this student to attend college, provided all resources were conserved toward that end. He therefore returned to Bartlett High School in January of 1925 to finish the year and graduate. This doubled the size of the first class of graduates from B.H.S. - from one to two! Both seniors went on to attend the University of New Hampshire as undergraduates. One went on to obtain advance degrees from Harvard University, while the other followed a career in electronics and aviation. After this lowly beginning, B.H.S. went on to successfully prepare students for advance study or life in an increasingly complex world. Bartlett High School numbers among its graduates persons who have successfully followed careers in business, science and research and persons who were later engaged in advancing education. Also included among B.H.S. graduates are many scattered about the world, among them are many high ranking military personnel. In the late 1950s, for economic and other reasons, the high school was discontinued and the students began to be bused to Kennett High School in Conway. This move made available to the students more varied curriculum's and modern facilities desirable to the learning process. Bartlett, in the opinion of one early graduate , can be justly proud of its young people’s accomplishments toward better education during the early 1920's. A careful study of the record seems to indicate that when it comes to a high school, big is not necessarily better. Mr. Chandler's Note: Bartlett High School graduates might be interested to know that William Hounsell (1898-1969) continued to further his career. He became the superintendent of schools in Penacook (N.H.) before he retired to Conway, where his widow, Hazel Towle Hounsell still makes her home. Schools Page 1 Schools Page 2

  • History hotels | Village | bartlett nh history

    Lodgings in and Near the village area page 3 Back to page 1 Back to page 2 Share The Upper Bartlett Lodging section began its journey in the center of Bartlett Village and previous pages covered the lodging establishments westward to Silver Springs Tavern, then eastwards as far as Coles Cabins This section begins at Sweet's Farm and works it's way eastward to the Attitash area. In my haste, some of the establishments in this area including Obed Hall's farm, Sky Valley, and The Maple Dale, were covered on the previous two pages in this lodging section. Upper Village Area Intervale Area Glen Area Historic Lodging Map Website editors note: As I continue working on this web site I have noticed that in the 1930's practically every establishment had gasoline pumps. In fact, between North Conway and the entrance to Crawford Notch there was a gas station just about every mile or two....and I have seen pictures of at least six active gas stations in Bartlett Village alone during the 1930's-40's. As late as 1970 the Village area had at least 5 operating gas and service stations. Now there are none. It also seems that practically everyone with a spare room was in the lodging business as well... Sweet's Farm Inn was located where the present day Skidaddlers Ski Club is now. It was owned and operated by George and Annie Sweet, who also operated the Gateway, about a mile west of Sweet's Farm, from 1890 until 1930. In 1918 George died of the flu and his Irish widow Annie continued to run the place with the help of her new husband, Luther Fernald. The Inn had 8 bedrooms in the main building and another 12 in the annex across the street. It also had an 8 car garage. One source says the Inn burned to the ground in 1938, but I remember an operating Inn being on that site well into the 1950's and Annie's daughter, Mary, lived in the annex for many years during the 1950's and 60's. I remember her because she drove a car with "LOVEY" on the license plate. As a young teenager I use to mow her grass occaisionally. About a half mile further east was Hellen Hayes Elmcrest Inn which operated until the early 1940's. It was later occupied by Carroll and Ellen (Sanborn) Hayes in the late 1950's. It still stands today across the street from the Villager Motel. Just up the street on the right Dot Stewart operated a small restaurant for a few years in the early 60's. It later became "Big Jim's Foot-Long Hot Dog Stand ". That building is now a part of the Villager Motel. In the 1800 - 1960 era nearly all the lands between The Elmcrest and Attitash were open farmlands. In fact, up to about 1960 there were few trees in either direction between Elmcrest and the Upper Village and all the way east to Roger's Crossing. This area had at least five good sized barns, all gone now. Just past Attitash on the left was the Smith Hurst and later the Bell Hurst, and up to the early seventies it was the home of the Scarecrow Restaurant , which is now located in Intervale. For a time in the 1960's the building operated a Sauna and Health club , but apparently that concept was not ready for prime-time back then since it only lasted a year or two. If you search through the Eastern Slope Signal newspapers in the index of this web site you will find a picture of several boys frollicking in the snow after heating up in the steam room. The building burned in the 1980's and was replaced with the apartment building that is there today. The property was once owned by the Laughlin Family whose son died while climbing the ledges on Mt Stanton behind the house. Tragically Mrs Laughlin was watching from the back porch when he took his fatal plunge. ​ The backside of the postcard dated 1938 is shown to the right. ​ Much earlier William White's Tavern was in this general location, probably another half-mile further east. William White's Farm in 1814 consisted of about 65 acres in the vicinity of todays Fields of Attitash. William White was also a sucsessor to Obed Hall in his Bartlett Village Establishment. I have been unable to find any information about his establishment located at his farm, if in fact there ever was one. Upper Village Area Intervale Area Glen Area Historic Lodging Map Historic Lodging Map Upper VillageHotels Lodging Page 1 Upper Village Lodging page 2 Upper Village Lodging page 3

  • Goodrich Falls | Hydroelectric plant | bartlett NH history

    Goodrich Falls Area Upper Bartlett Glen Area Cooks Crossing Goodrich Falls Jericho Intervale Dundee West Side Road Ownership/Regulatory Status ​ The Goodrich Falls hydroelectric project (the “Goodrich Falls project”) presently (as of 2015) owned and operated by the Goodrich Falls Hydroelectric Corporation, a New Hampshire corporation formed in 1977 for the sole purpose of owning and operating the Goodrich Falls project. The history of development, ownership and operation of the Goodrich Falls project is described below. ​ The Goodrich Falls project was constructed in the early 1900’s by Edwin Moody, the owner and operator of the Black Mountain Ski Area and Phil Robertson of the local electric department in Jackson, NH. To attract skiers to Black Mountain, which at that time was known as Moody’s. Edwin Moody and local inventor, George Morton , constructed one of the first ski lifts in NH. The Goodrich Falls project was constructed in concert with the lift in order to provide daytime power for the lift and nighttime power for the skiers staying in Moody’s lodge. Ownership of the project was transferred to the Goodrich Falls Hydroelectric Corporation in 1977 and was operated as an unlicensed facility until its application to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for an exemption under Part I of the Federal Power Act. On January 8, 2001, the Goodrich Falls Hydroelectric Corporation (“GFHC”), filed an application to exempt the existing, unlicensed, 550-kilowatt Goodrich Falls project from the licensing requirements set forth under Section 408 of the Energy Security Act and Part I of the Federal Power Act (FPA). The project is located on the Ellis River, in the town of Bartlett , Carroll County, New Hampshire. On March 14, 2002, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (the “FERC”) issued an Order Granting Exemption from Licensing (the “Exemption”) for a project 5MW or less, to GFHC for the continued operation of the Goodrich Falls project, FERC Project No. 11870 (see Appendix 1-1). Included in the exemption were additional measures to protect, mitigate adverse impacts to, and enhance project-related environmental resources. ​ Construction of the Goodrich Falls project was completed in 1935 when first power was generated. The project has operated successfully since initial power was generated in 1935. The Turbine Room at Goodrich Falls Hydro Plant. Photo is un-dated so it may not look like this now. Mills. -The first gristmill Hazen Pitman remembers was Joseph Thomp- son's at Centre Bartlett on Ellis river. This was carried off by a freshet years ago. Soon after the road from Jackson to Glen station was opened, Mr Goodrich built a saw and grist mill on the Kails that bear his name, and the site has been ever since occupied by a mill of some sort, a very line one being now there. Allium Allen had a mill close by the present village of Bartlett. This was long in use. Frank George and Levi Rogers bought the property, and the mill was given up in decay. A small mill was in operation on Stillings hrook in Upper Bartlett under the ownership of Samuel Parker. John Pitman linilt a sawmill about islO, near his home on East branch, a mile above the valley road, and Stephen Burbank had a saw and gristmill in Jericho on Rocky Branch. ​ source Merrill History of Carroll County

  • Tourism & Hotels | bartlett nh history

    Tourism - Hotels & Lodgings in Bartlett We have compiled a sizable quantity of information about how the tourism industry developed in Bartlett. From subsistence level boarding houses to large elaborate hotels, Bartlett has seen them all come and go over the years. Pick your section of town from the links to the right. Chose the area of Town to find the individual establishments that were (or are) located there. Lodging Preface Upper Village Area Glen Area Intervale Area Historic Lodging Map Hotel The Cave Mountain House - The Howard - The Bartlett Hotel - the story as we know it, all on one page. 1890 to 1989 Bellevue The Bellevue Hotel at Intervale and the Barnes family 1872 to 1936 We have identified more than 50 inns and hotels that operated in bartlett over the years. Some have more information than others. Abenaki, the (Upper Bartlett Village) Bartlett House (the) 1856-1892 Beechwood (the) 1977-present Red Apple Inn Bellhurst Bellevue (Intervale) Bide-a-Wee 1920-1941 Broadview (Intervale 1924) Cannells Camps Castner’s Camps 1930-1950? Cave Mountain House (the) 1890-1905 Cedarcroft 1892-1953 Centre Bartlett House Joseph Mead Charlie’s Cabins 1930-1960 Cole’s Camps 1935-Present Better Life Cabins Comstock Inn Country Squire Motor Lodge 1966-present Dunrovin’ 1910-1945 East Branch House 1810-1898 Elmcrest 1930-1940 Elmwood Inn Elms (the) Emerson Inn - burned in 1948 Fairview Cottage 1854- Forest (the) Forest Inn Fosscroft 1928-1950 (replaced the Langdon House Garland (the) 1905- Gateway, the 1890-1990 The Target/Abenaki Glendennings Camps 1932- Glenwood by the Saco Goodrich Falls Cabins Hampshire House Headlands, the (intervale) Howard (the) 1912-1989 Intervale House, the 1860-29. Linderhoff Motor Lodge 1966-1995 Lone Maple Cottage 1930-1960 Langdon House 1880 - Maple Cottage 1920-1950 Maple Dale Cottage 1928-1959 Maple Villa Matthews Inn 1938-1942 - Formerly Pitman's Annex Meadowbrook 1945-Present Wills Inn Mt Surprise Cottage (Kearsarge) Mountain Home Cabins 1931-present Mountain Rest 1809-present New England Inn Norland Cottage North Colony Motel 1974-present Obed Halls Tavern Old Fieldhouse, the 1964-present Pequawket House 1854 Perry's Rest 1934-present Pines (the) 1925-Present Bartlett Country Inn Pine Cottage Pitman Hall 1905-mid1930's Pleasant Valley Hall 1893-present Red Apple Inn Riverside Roselawn 1910-1926 Saco River Cabins 1935-1992 Forbes Silver Springs Cottage 1900- Silver Springs Tavern 1930-1990 Sky Valley Motel 1950-present Spruce Knoll Tea Room & Cabins Stilphen’s Farm 1810- Sweets Farm Inn 1920-1938 Swiss Chalets 1965 - present Target, the (later the Abenaki) Tasker Cottage Thompson’s Inn 1918-1990 (Later The Chippanock Titus Browns Inn 1810 Upper Bartlett House 1854- Villager, the 1972-present Wayside Inn of Sam Stillings William Whites Tavern Willow Cottage Inn 1910-1925 Woodbine Cottage Woodshed the 1920-1971 (Earlier Fosey's Roadhouse) Dave is working on this section...bear with me.

  • Railroad History | bartlett nh history

    Top of Page scottymallett Railroad History Scotty Mallett is working on this section Please check the menu at top left for more pages. More Railroad Pages - Menu Top Right... The Portland & Ogdensburg Railroad was chartered on February 11, 1867 to run from Portland to Fabyan, a junction at Carroll, New Hampshire in the White Mountains, where the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad would continue west. The tracks reached Bartlett Village in 1873. Their track joined in a ceremony at the summit of Crawford Notch on August 7, 1875, then opened on August 16, 1875. The P&O Railroad Tames Crawford Notch After reaching Bartlett in 1873 the P&O Railroad faced the arduous task of building the rail line through Crawford Notch to Fabyan. It took two years to build that section of less than 20 miles. Our friends at White Mountain History have compiled a very good story and pictures of the challenges facing the railroad builders. Wiley Brook Bridge White Mountain History - P&O Railroad Bartlett to Fabyan Frankenstein Trestle More Railroad Pages - Menu Top Right...

  • Railroad 2 | bartlett nh history

    2 More Railroad Pages - Menu Top Right... Bartlett Village Railroad Station And yard This page was researched and written by Scotty Mallett We are working on this page The first Bartlett Railroad station was built in the fall of 1872 and passenger trains started running to Bartlett on October 20, 1873. The first station was built next to Mill Brook and was 3 stories in height. This station was lost along with the freight house in the town fire of 1896. (See Side Bar) The first Bartlett Village Station circa 1873 Photo Credit Bill Gove The second station was built in 1896 after the town fire. It was a large 3 storied building and was so well liked and constructed it was mentioned in the State of New Hampshire Railroad commissioner’s Report. The station had a ticket office, a telegrapher’s office, a western union office, a waiting Room, a Restaurant, A large station platform with a canopy to protect the passengers from the elements, oak walls with gold inlay, marble wash basins and hardwood floors. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ There are conflicting dates of when this station burned but Maine Central Railroad records say it burned in 1920. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ T he third station was built that same year (1920). The reason for the speedy rebuild of the 3rd and final Bartlett station is because Maine Central used elements of the second station for the new 3rd station. This station used the reclaimed 1st floor the second and 3rd floor were removed. It retained the marble wash basins, the telegraphers, Western Union and ticket offices, the hardwood floors, the waiting room and the oak walls with gold inlay. ​ The Bartlett Station, on the right, early 1950's. Big building at left was the Honeywell Thermostat Factory and before that G.K Howard's Hardware Merchandise store. (Mt Carrigain under the signal pole) Photo Credit: Dane Malcolm. In 1958 the Maine Central Railroad abolished passenger service. The Portland and Ogdensburg Railroad and then the Maine Central Railroad ran passenger service from 1873-1958. The Bartlett Station was sold to a ski club in 1959. In October 1959 the ski club were doing renovations to the inside of the building, stirring up coal dust left from years of coal being used to heat the building. A new oil furnace was installed to keep the station warm in the coming winter months. Later that day after everyone had left, the new furnace clicked on igniting the coal dust left in the air. The station, now a private building was never rebuilt. Today people at a glance see the beautiful Hodgkin’s Memorial Park. The outline of the east end of the granite cellar wall can be found. The soil is reclaiming the spot and eventually there will be no trace of the station, only memories. This photo dated 1908 sIDE bAR THE TOWN FIRE 1896: Concord Evening Monitor 1893 (1896)? Fire Sunday Destroys Entire Business District in Bartlett Total damage will approximate $100,000 At 5 o’clock a fire was discovered at rear of H. L. Towle’s grocery store and as there was no fire department in the village, it spread with lightening like rapidity. Word was telegraphed to North Conway for aid and at 7 o’clock a special train left for the scene. The ten mile run was made in a little over ten minutes. When the special arrived the business portion of the town was in ashes. The most strenuous efforts of the town’s people, assisted by the willing guests of the hotels availed to nothing. Within 2-½ hours but one store was left in the place. Fourteen families had been burned out and the Maine Central Railway Station, restaurant, and freight depot, together with the post office were destroyed.The total damage will be in the neighborhood of $100,000. Following are the principal losses: -Maine Central Railway about $10,000, insured -Mr. & Mrs. Foster, general store, buildings, stock $25,000, insured for $7,500 -P.J. Martin, general store, $15,000, insured $9,000 -F. Garland, drugs and jewelry, $2,500, insurance $1,500 -E.O. Garland, building, contents, $15,000 insured $7,000 -J. Emery, house and furnishings, $3,000 insured $1,500 -J. Head house $1,500 -H.E. Brooks (?) grocery store, $2,500 insured $1,000 -H.L. Towle’s building, $3,000, insured $1,000 -A.L. Meserve building and stock, $6,000 insured $2,800 -Miss Emily A. Merserve tenement block, $2000, insured $1,500 -Miss Bates, millinery $500 The town has an ordinary population of 2,000 but this is swelled in summer to three or four times this number. It is situated in the White Mountain Division of the Maine Central Railroad and the ride over this road from North Conway through Bartlett to the Crawford Notch is one of the finest in the eastern part of the country. -From the history files at the Bartlett Public Library ​ The Portland & Ogdensburg Railroad was chartered on February 11, 1867 to run from Portland to Fabyan, a junction at Carroll, New Hampshire in the White Mountains, where the Boston, Concord & Montreal Railroad would continue west. Their track joined in a ceremony at the summit of Crawford Notch on August 7, 1875, then opened on August 16, 1875. Here we have, left to right...Edward Boynton Knight...George Lincoln Knight...Baby is Brian Aston Knight...and Charles Edward Knight. Charles worked as signal repairman in the Bartlett train yard and in his fifty years of work he never missed a single day. Charles also worked as watchman at the Peg Mill. I also heard from a close source..that Charles peddled booze during prohibition. Photo courtesy of Robert Girouard who received it, and this story, from Brian Knight in June 2009. The Bartlett Yard Roundhouse Preservation Society has been very busy in their endeavors to memorialize and save this structure. They provided this history. ROUNDHOUSE HISTORY Steam locomotives at the Bartlett Roundhouse. The locomotives and their crews - circa 1891 The five locomotives left to right are Maine Central Railroad Locomotives. The one on the far right is the locomotive of the Bartlett & Albany Railroad. The trains the locomotives are assigned to are on the headlamps of the locomotives. The one that says W on the headlamp was for a work train. Bartlett Round House - Had a turntable for turning around the locomotives. The turntable was removed in 1913. There were switches into the roundhouse. The date of that photo is September 8, 1947, and the photo was taken by Phillip Hastings. Bartlett Yard Freight Office - 1960 Men at the Bartlett Yard Office, September 1961. Left to right: Bob Jones, Albert Henn and Bud Burdwood. Trainmen at the Bartlett Yard with the Mountaineer, Later the Flying Yankee. Dated 1939. (David Dudley was the man who could always be found in the caboose.) Snowplow train approaching the Bartlett Yard at Rogers Crossing. Sometime in the 1960's. Snowplow train at the Bartlett Yard Sometime in the 1960's. How this abandoned train car ended up in the Bartlett Yard This article was written in 2014 Link to NH Public Radio Article At one time the Bartlett Peg Mill was serviced by the Maine Central Railroad. The spur came off the wye and ended on the left side of the peg mill. The sidings for the peg mill had a capacity of 49 cars. There is no date as to when the spur and trackage, the rails of which were owned by the Maine Central Railroad, were removed. The site map below is courtesy Bill Gove. More Railroad Pages - Menu Top Right... the bartlett yard circa 1900 paragraph place holder If you use an I-Pad you can enlarge this map to read the building titles. Ralph M. Hebb - Station Agent in Bartlett, NH for 21 years - 1918 to 1939 Link Mountain Division at Facebook There are many more pictures at the Facebook Page "MEC RR MT DIVISION".

  • History Bartlett NH village area

    Share Village Area Page 2 The Village Area of Bartlett Upper Bartlett Glen Area Cooks Crossing Goodrich Falls Jericho Intervale Dundee West Side Road Village Area Page 1 Village Area Page 2 Village Area Page 3 Village Area Page 4 Village Area Page 5 These Links Will Open in a New Window Upper Bartlett Village in the mid 1950's. The outline of the Thermostat Factory is visible behind the cloud of smoke. Photo courtesy Alan Eliason. FOR THOSE NOT ACQUAINTED WITH BARTLETT, The Town is divided into several sub-communities and areas that in their entirety are The Town of Bartlett. The map shows the distinctive neighborhoods. Beginning at the west is The Upper Village, which is most notable for the Josiah Bartlett School. Glen is the central part of the town centering on the junction of Routes 16 & 302. Glen has several subsections, primarily Cooks Crossing (some refer to it as sucker brook) which is the upper section of the West Side Road . Goodrich Falls is the northern area that abuts the Town of Jackson. Jericho is located about a mile west of the Junction of Route 16 & 302 and it encompasses the Rocky Branch area. Intervale is the eastern part of Town beginning at about the junction of Rte 16A Resort Loop and ending at the Scenic Vista and the North Conway Town line. The westerly side of Hurricane Mountain Road up into Kearsarge is also part of Bartlett. Long before Attitash, there were very popular ski runs on Bear Mountain. This photo 1941 looks north towards Mt Washington.The Village was also home to Stanton Slopes , with a rope tow. It operated in the 40's and 50's. It was located in the cleared area about in the center of this picture. For a very good article about all the bartlett Ski Businesses in the early days, go to http://www.skimuseum.org Bartlett, NH Tavern Fire, Apr 1879 THE BARTLETT FIRE.----Our Conway correspondent writes that the loss to Mr. N. T. Stillings of Bartlett, whose tavern stand and out-buildings were destroyed by fire on the 3d, is $5000, with no insurance. The loss will be a heavy one to Mr. S., whose popular tavern and stage lines were so well known among the pilgrims to "the Switzerland of America." The fire is thought to have originated from a defective chimney. The family of Mr. S, was away at the time of the fire. The New Hampshire Patriot, Concord, NH 13 Apr 1879 George Chappee, Tinker Ainsworth, Jimmy Clemons, with a not too happy looking deer. This house is on River Street near the VFW hall. Photo Courtesy of Maureen Hussey The Village was once dominated by the Railroad and most of the residents depended on it for their livelihood. The Village in those days had several restaurants, bars, a movie theatre, hotel and lodgings, a hardware store, several grocery stores and many other commercial activities. By contrast, it is a relatively peaceful village today. G.K. Howard Hardware Store, also on Albany Avenue. Later it was The Thermostat Factory. Going up Albany Ave towards Bear Notch Road it was just across the tracks on the left. Today there are some condo type units in the same spot. There was a building just before the tracks on the right that housed Wimpy Thurston's Grocery Store, later operated by the Jacobson's . The building looked similar to the GK howard Store but without the dormers. Today that site is an empty lot adjacent to the former Garland Inn , and as of 2019 the Hodgkins residence. 1951; Hanging out at the GK Howard Store are Vin at back left, Bucky (Rogerson?) front left, Peggy and Neal Trecarten. Granville K. Howard, Prominent Bartlett Resident Dies In the passing of Granville K. Howard on Nov. 17 at his home after a brief illness, Bartlett has lost one of its outstanding citizens. Born in Hartford, Vt ., in 1864, he was graduated from Dartmouth in the class of 1886 and always kept up his interests in the activities of the college. In 1887 he married Nellie Bailey of Landgrove, Vt ., and two years later he moved to Bartlett . From that time until his retirement in 1946 he was active in business, conducting a general store. In 1912 he built the Howard Hotel , which is now known as Bartlett Hotel. Mr. Howard held many town offices, having served as selectman and as a member of the school board. He was instrumental in forming the Bartlett Water Precinct of which he was treasurer for 51 years. Always interested in the welfare of the town, one of his last acts was to give a plot of land opposite the hotel for a public park . For many years he was active in Osceola Lodge, I. O. O. F. , and was recently awarded his 50 year pin. His counsel and guidance will be missed by the many people who always found him a friend in time of need. Funeral services were held on Sunday, Nov. 20 at 2 p.m. at the Bartlett Congregational Church.- The Reporter, Thursday, November 24, 1949 -pg 1 Across the Street from G.K HOWARD'S STORE IS THE BOOKER BUILDING ON ALBANY AVENUE. It housed Garland's Store, a Barbershop operated by Claude Dearborn. The Post Office was there until it moved down the street next door to Franklin George's "What Not Shop" by the Park. No Date was provided but probably in the 1945-1955 range. Garlands was a drug store, but also sold clothing, footwear and hardware. It was later operated by Joe Briggs. Arlene Hamel and another lady had a restaurant there as did Henrietta Trecarten and Evelyn Tibbets at a later date. There was also a Bakery on the lower level. If you knew of Stan Smearer and Jenny Sweeney, among others, lived in the apartments upstairs. Village Area Page 1 Village Area Page 2 Village Area Page 3 Village Area Page 4 Village Area Page 5 This picture shows the old General Thermostat Corp Building which was owned by a Mr Frank Reingruber. He lived on the upper floor. He had patented several various forms of thermostats from 1945 to 1971. He probably employed about 30 people. His building was the former G.K. Howard Store. He operated there from the early 1950's to the early 1960's. This editor does not know where he went after his factory closed however he had another thermostat patent approved in 1971, The backside of this July 1957 card is addressed to Mr Russ Hosmer in Wilmerding Penn. and the writer is one Alan T. There is mention of the Edaville Railroad and it sounds like Alan T was a scout looking for old railroad equipment to buy. Not that it has any bearing, but Wilmerding is home to the George Westinghouse Mansion. 1983 Bartlett Village, School in foreground, Bartlett Hotel left side: Ed Pettengill: "I found this on the internet...it said Bartlett NH Aerial photo circa 1983...based on the new wing on the school, and the school bus parked by the garage, that's accurate within a year. The new wing was built around 1980 - I was in eighth grade when they were building it - so that's the oldest the picture could be. If anyone has pictures of Bartlett from either the Bear Notch overlooks, Attitash, or Cave Mountain or Hart's ledge, please post them. Those pictures of Bartlett from overhead are great". Editors Note, this is a Roger Marcoux Photo This picture shows Mountain Home when the Nutes owned it and operated a large farm extending westward to Silver Springs, Eastward to about where The Bartlett Inn is located today and Northward to the Saco River. They catered to guests who wanted to stay on a working farm for the summer. This picture shows the Nutes standing in front of their farmhouse. The notation on the back of the card is shown below. Additions? Corrections? Mistakes? Just plain Lies? Please Tell the Website Editor Using the Contact Us Link in the Top Heading ! Village Area Page 1 Village Area Page 2 Village Area Page 3 Village Area Page 4 Village Area Page 5 Village Area Page 2

  • Bellvue Hotel - Barnes | bartletthistory

    The Bellevue 1872 to 1936 The Bellevue was located directly opposite from today's south end of the Rte 16A Junction near the Scenic Vista. SOURCE MATERIAL: The Intervale, New Hampshire By Winfield S. Nevins 1887 The Bellevue, John Albert Barnesproprietor, stands on the knoll just beyond the Intervale. It is a sightly location and one excellently adapted for perfect drainage and to insure health and comfort. Mr. Barnes built this house himself in 1872, and for fifteen years has been its popular landlord and proprietor. Hundreds of New England people have found here a pleasant summer home. In the fall of 1886, the house was very materially enlarged by the addition of an L to the rear which nearly doubles its capacity. The house now accommodates about seventy guests, all in good rooms. It is kept open from the first of June until the last of October. The nearby Clarendon was annexed as part of the Bellevue complex and by 1901 The Bellevue was open during the winter specializing in sleighing, snowshoeing, coasting, camping and tobogganing . Skiing had not yet arrived in the White Mountains. The Bellevue was destroyed by fire in 1938. Card dated October 4, 1919 SOURCE MATERIAL: American Series of Popular Biographies - NEW HAMPSHIRE EDITION THIS VOLUME CONTAINS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF The State of New Hampshire. B O S T ON NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 15 COURT SQUARE - 1902. ​ Editors Note: I have left this text exactly as it was printed in the publication, even though it is a bit cumbersome and obscure in places. -------------------------------------------------------------------- WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE BARNES FAMILY: ​ JOHN ALBERT BARNES , for years proprietor of the Bellevue House at Intervale, N.H., was born in Kearsarge Village, N. H., October 12, 1832, and died 1889. ​ His father, the late John M. Barnes , was a farmer, and resided at Intervale and also engaged in the hotel business, for several years conducting the Blue Blind Cottage, on what is now known as the Dr. Merriam place. (might have been near today's Stonehurst Manor) He died, at about sixty years of age, in Conway. ​ He (John A) married Hannah Willey, of Conway, and they had two children: John A., the subject of this sketch ; and Mary, deceased, who married Levi Wheeler, of Littleton, John A. Barnes was educated in his native town, attending the district school and the academy; and from his early years until his death was more or less identified with hotel management, proving himself competent in every position that he assumed, as landlord winning friends and fame. In 1872 he opened the Bellevue House, t hen much smaller than now, and met with such success that much more room was needed; and in 1887 he enlarged it Since his death this hotel and also the Clarendon have been managed by his sons, under the name of J. A. Barnes' Sons. Mr. Barnes was an active, public-spirited citizen, never shirking the responsibilities of office, serving for five or six years as Selectman, and as Representative to the State Legislature in 1883 and in 1885. ​ He married Mary Elizabeth Tufts, one of the seven children of Nathaniel Tufts, the others being Marcena, Vienna, George, Mehit Martha. descendant of one of the passengers who came abel, Victoria, and She was a de over on the “Mayflower.” Five children were born of their union, three sons and two daughters, namely: John Frederick, who married Lillian Ward, of Me. ; George Tufts, who married, first, Minnie Pit - Bennett Fryeburg, man, by whom he had two children, and, second, Ursula Lincoln, of Franklin, Mass. ; Dennis Wheeler, of Intervale; Effie Lizzie; and Bertha May, who is now deceased. ​ John M. Barnes, who was born in February, I79I, Hannah Willey, sister of the Mr. Willey who, died January 1825, married with his family, was killed by the awful mountain slide of 1826. ​ Polly Barnes, born December 22, 1792, married Jonathan Seavey, of Bartlett, and died September 27, 1847. born February 20, 1794, died May 10, 1797. Amos, Richard E. Barnes, born February 25, 1798, married a widow, Mrs. Amanda Cram Boston, and died October 28, 1888. Cynthia, born Jan Sally, born May 21, 1803, married Nathan Chandler, uary 10, 1800, died October 5, 1814. of Fryeburg, and resided in Conway, where her Abiah E. Barnes, born May 3, 1805, died, unmarried, death occurred December 27, 1890. November. 1, 1878. Alonzo W. Barnes, who was born February 16, 1807, and died February 22, 1900, married Almina Merrill. Albert Barnes, the special subject of this sketch, was educated in the schools of Conway. Having learned the carpenter's trade when young, he followed it until 1891, since that time devoting his attention to farming. In 1896 he was appointed Postmaster at Kearsarge Village, a position that he still retains. He is a stanch Democrat in politics, and for two years served as Selectman. He is a member of the Congregational church. Mr. Barnes married November 3, 1848, Almira H. Seavey, of Conway, daughter of Simon and Betsey (Hendly) Seavey and one of a family of six children. Two brothers of Mrs. Barnes are deceased, namely: Calvin, who died young; and Orrin, who married Lydia East In a n. Her surviving brother and sisters are: Isaiah, residing in Kearsarge, who married Miss Ella Burbank; Clarissa A., wife of Ezra R. Eastman; and Maria, widow of the late George Clark, of Kearsarge. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes have two children – Clara and Lester C. Clara Ella Barnes, born in 1851 in Conway, is the wife of H. H. Dow, of Kearsarge, and the mother of two children — Helen M. and Albert Barnes Dow. C. Barnes, born at Kearsarge in 1866, lives on the homestead. He married Nellie O. Eastman, daughter of Alfred A. and Olive Eastman; and they have two children — Leah M. and Ralph Lester. January 28, 1938 Sources: Incidents in White Mountain history - by Rev. Benjamin G. Willey https://www.ancestry.com › genealogy › records › levi-chubbuck_91882748 "The History of Carroll County", 1889, Georgia Drew Merrill brooklyncentre.com › trees › getperson Bartlett NH - In the Valley of the Saco - Aileen Carroll - 1990 Lucy Crawford's History of the White Mountains - circa 1860 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF The State of New Hampshire • BOSTON - NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 15 COURT SQUARE 1902

  • Intervale Station | bartletthistory

    Intervale Station More Railroad Pages - Menu Top Right... The Intervale Station is located on Intervale Crossroads. It was a popular stop for the hotels in this area such as The Intervale House, Pendexter Mansion and The Intervale Inn, to name just a few. The Intervale Station is located on Intervale Crossroads. It was a popular stop for the hotels in this area such as The Intervale House, Pendexter Mansion and The Intervale Inn, to name just a few. Undated Intervale Station photo with Mt Washington setting the tone. The station as it appeared in the early 1970's Mt Washington in the background. Intervale Station researched and written by Scotty Mallett Intervale Station, located 64.4 miles from Portland, Maine, was originally named Intervale Junction. It was a junction point between the Maine Central and Boston and Maine Railroads. The information on the beginning and operations of this depot are sparse to say the least. However, what is known is that the Intervale Station was the crew change point for the famed “Mountaineer” that came up from Boston to Intervale. Once the train crews swapped, the B&M crew would stay in a caboose on a sidetrack waiting for the return of their equipment. Here is some more information from Dwight Smith, former owner of Conway Scenic Railroad: "The railroad station at Intervale, NH was served by both the Maine Central and Boston & Maine Railroads. The final Maine Central passenger train was on the date the MeC discontinued rail passenger service between Portland, ME and St. Johnsbury, VT. (1958) I’m not sure when the B&M ended service to Intervale, but the final B&M passenger train from Boston to North Conway was a RPO/Express/Coach Budd-liner about 1960. ( What's a Buddliner, you ask? Picture at right ) ​ The MeC and B&M occasionally interchanged freight cars at Intervale, which included tank cars of petroleum products that originated in Portland, destined to Conway, NH. With the establishment of Conway Scenic RR (1974) and until the end of Maine Central service to Intervale (1958) second-hand passenger and freight cars plus carloads of coal were interchanged from the MeC to the CSRR. Today (2019) Passenger Trains of Conway Scenic Railroad running between North Conway and Bartlett, Crawford Notch, Fabyans, and the MeC bridge over the Saco are utilizing former Maine Central RR tracks that passes through Bartlett and makes connections to the former B&M tracks at “Mountain Junction” in Portland Maine." ​ The sidings at Intervale could hold a maximum of 41 cars. There was also a freight house next to the station. The freight house is now located at the Kearsarge Cemetery, functioning as an equipment shed. The station closed on August 17, 1958. It survived as a private dwelling and in the late 1980’s it was moved off site and incorporated into a 2 storied private home in the Intervale area. P.S. We know that the Intervale Depot was located on the North Conway side of Intervale but as it was in throwing distance of the Bartlett town line and it was the first depot to be built after the year hiatus in building the line, we thought we would throw this in for free. ​ Additional Information: MOUNTAIN DIVISION RAIL STUDY REPORT ON POTENTIAL USES AND IMPLEMENTATION COSTS More Railroad Pages - Menu Top Right... Mountain Division Rail Study 1897 Petition to the Board of Railroad Commissioners for a new crossing near the Intervale Depot. B&M RR Historical Society Newsletter March - April 2008 - M emories By Ted Houghton ​ The Intervale Post Office back in the 50's was in a little building just north of the station. The B&M track was on the west side of the station, and ended at the NW corner of the station. The PO was in a direct line with the B&M tracks, with a paved parking parking between the two. Extending about 2/3 of the way northward across the parking lot was a deep set of grooves in the pavement, about 4' 8 1/2" apart. Ted Drew, the old Postmaster, told me of their origin. One day a train didn't quite stop when it should have, and went off the end of the track, headed right for the Post Office. Ole Ted saw it coming and bailed out the side window of the PO. Fortunately the loco stopped before making it all the way across the parking lot. My folks bought an inn in Intervale in 1950, when I was 6 years old. I remember picking up guests at the Intervale station in the very early 50's, and then the B&M cut passenger service back to North Conway, so we had to go down there. A little later, service on the Conway was totally curtailed, so then for a year or two, Dad would go to Berlin to pick up folks. Several times I rode trains from Intervale or North Conway down to North Station, all by myself, to visit my grandparents who lived out in Dover MA. And then there were the ski trains . What a sight it was when the train pulled into North Conway in the morning and hundreds of skiers, with their skis over their shoulders, would trudge up Kearsarge Street to Cranmore, where they would spend the day on the Skimobile. I had some Snow Train paper (schedules, menus, etc.), which I sold on eBay a couple of years ago - went like hotcakes. It was interesting to watch the fortunes of the North Conway depot rise and fall. In the early 50's, it was fairly well kept up and was a dark green. After a paint conversion to the more modern tan and maroon, it fell into disrepair and was boarded up for several years. Then Dwight Smith, with the backing of some local businessmen, brought the Conway Scenic RR to life and beautifully restored the station. That's the extent of my recollections of B&M activity in Intervale/North Conway. My big regret is that I didn't start taking pictures much sooner. (Don't we all have that regret-ed). Mountain Division at Facebook There are many more pictures at the Facebook Page "MEC RR MT DIVISION". Maine Central RR Newsletter 1951 ​ William Burdwood Jr . 1951 - Grandson of Bud Burdwood - Bartlett ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ George Peters - Section Forman at Bartlett ​ ​ ​ Frank Boothby - Agent at Intervale - died ​ Agent A.E. Garon - new at Intervale Station ​ O.E. Henson - Engineer - Injured in accident

  • Frankenstein Godfrey | bartletthistory

    Godfrey Nicholas Frankenstein 1820 - 1873 Frankenstein Cliff and Trestle in Crawford Notch Story by Scotty Mallett - Railroad Historian Godfrey N. Frankenstein was born in Darmstadt, Germany in 1820. He and his family fled and immigrated to America in 1831 eventually settling in Ohio. The 1830’s wave of emigration from Germany was caused chiefly by economic hardships, including unemployment and crop failures. Many Germans also left to avoid wars and military service. In some cases, government entities encouraged poor citizens to emigrate. Godfrey had 3 siblings, all of whom became artists. At the age of 13 he became a sign painter and at the age of 19 was a portrait painter. In 1841 he founded and was the first president of the Cincinnati Academy of Fine Arts. ​ When he was 24, in 1844, he went to Niagara Falls. The grandeur of the Falls impressed upon him a new direction. Over a nine year period he would paint hundreds of scenes of the Falls all from different perspectives. Beginning in 1853 he then began a five year process to transfer the sketches to canvas. He picked 80 to 100 good drawings and copied each one to single panels that stood at least eight feet high. The end product was a roll of canvas that when unfurled was nearly 1000 feet long. Frankenstein cleverly juxtaposed scenes from different years to show the changes. In 1858 he began to show them to audiences, mostly in New York City, one at a time, like a moving picture, telling a story in the process. At fifty cents per person to see the show it was a success beyond his expectations. ​ In 1867, Frankenstein traveled to Europe and spent two years abroad painting many mountain landscapes. Below, "The Mill Pond" in Ohio ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Godfrey had a great love of the White Mountains and when traveling there he stayed with Dr. Samuel Bemis (1793–1881) at his stone cottage in Crawford Notch, later known as the Inn Unique and currently The Notchland Inn, and he formed a friendship with Bemis. Dr. Bemis owned most of the Crawford Notch at that time and named the cliffs and the gulf below after his friend Frankenstein. It is said that Mr. Frankenstein painted many White Mountains scenes yet these paintings are hard to find. ​ Frankenstein would die in 1873 at his home in Springfield, Ohio. Two years later, in 1875, when the Portland and Ogdensburg Railroad built the Railroad through Crawford Notch the trestle that stands today was named Frankenstein Trestle. ​ ​ Sources: https://unrememberedhistory.com/tag/godfrey-nicholas-frankenstein/ ​ http://www.cowhampshireblog.com/2006/05/28/new-hampshire-when-frankenstein-roamed-the-white-mountains/ ​ https://www.hisour.com/godfrey-frankenstein-15867/ ​ https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/portrait-godfrey-frankenstein-8570 ​ Godfrey Frankenstein's 1848 Painting of "Mount Washington Over Tuckerman's Ravine" can be found at this link. http://whitemountainprints.org/Godfrey_Frankenstein.html

  • Dundee | bartletthistory

    Upper Bartlett Glen Area Cooks Crossing Goodrich Falls Jericho Intervale Dundee West Side Road

  • history | Lodging Hotels Preface | bartlett nh history

    Hotels - Inns - Cabins - Boarding - a brief preface Share Aside from the railroad, tourism may have been Bartlett's second largest industry. We have identified about 75 historical lodging establishments, although there are probably a few more that have been forgotten over the years. Many of the names are for the same buildings during different time periods. The various Inns and Lodgings are broken down into three separate sections as shown in the links below: As with everything else in this website, WE WELCOME YOUR INPUT for updates, corrections, additions or whatever else. Simply click the orange circle. We would like to hear from you ! The saga of hotels, inns and taverns is integral to the history of New Hampshire’s White Mountains. Early settlers were quick to realize the potential value of offering lodging to teamsters, explorers and naturalists. As the region’s fame spread, businessmen and prosperous farmers began to visit the mountains. When travel to the “Crystal Hills” became easier, the area blossomed into a playground for the well-to-do. ​ Before the era of railroads and big hotels accommodations were somewhat limited. There were many small taverns where wayward travelers and stage coaches stopped. One of Bartlett's earliest establishments, that still exists, is the Mountain Home Cabins. Upper Village Area Intervale Area Glen Area Historic Lodging Map Many of the lodging places shown in the list below can be found on the historic map included. You can access it by clicking the blue box link below: Historic Lodging Map 1. Bartlett House (the) 1856-1892 2. Beechwood (the) 1977-present Red Apple Inn 3 Bellhurst 4. Bellevue (Intervale) 5. Bide-a-Wee 1920-1941 6. Broadview (Intervale 1924) 7. Cannells Camps 8. Castner’s Camps 1930-1950? 9. Cave Mountain House (the) 1890-1905 10. Cedarcroft 1892-1953 11. Centre Bartlett House Joseph Mead 12. Charlie’s Cabins 1930-1960 13. Cole’s Camps 1935-Present Better Life Cabins 14. Comstock Inn 15. Country Squire Motor Lodge 1966-present 16. Dunrovin’ 1910-1945 17. East Branch House 1810-1898 18. Elmcrest 1930-1940 19. Elmwood Inn 20. Elms (the) 21. Emerson Inn - burned in 1948 22. Fairview Cottage 1854- 23. Forest (the) 24. Forest Inn 25. Fosscroft 1928-1950 (replaced the Langdon House 26. Garland (the) 1905- 27. Gateway, the 1890-1990 The Target/Abenaki 28. Glendennings Camps 1932- 29. Glenwood by the Saco 30. Goodrich Falls Cabins 31. Hampshire House 32. Headlands, the (intervale) 33. Howard (the) 1912-1989 34. Intervale House, the 1860- 35. Linderhoff Motor Lodge 1966-1995 36. Lone Maple Cottage 1930-1960 37. Langdon House 1880 - 38. Maple Cottage 1920-1950 39. Maple Dale Cottage 1928-1959 40. Maple Villa 41. Meadowbrook 1945-Present Wills Inn 42. Mt Surprise Cottage (Kearsarge) 43. Mountain Home Cabins 1931-present 44. Mountain Rest 1809-present New England Inn 45. Norland Cottage 46. North Colony Motel 1974-present 47. Obed Halls Tavern 48. Old Fieldhouse, the 1964-present 49. Pequawket House 1854 50. Perry's Rest 1934-present 51. Pines (the) 1925-Present Bartlett Country Inn 52. Pine Cottage 53. Pitman Hall 1905-mid1930's 54. Pleasant Valley Hall 1893-present 55 Red Apple Inn 56. Riverside 57. Roselawn 1910-1926 58. Saco River Cabins 1935-1992 Forbes 59. Silver Springs Cottage 1900- 60. Silver Springs Tavern 1930-1990 61 Sky Valley Motel 1950-present 62. Spruce Knoll Tea Room & Cabins 63. Stilphen’s Farm 1810- 64. Sweets Farm Inn 1920-1938 65. Swiss Chalets 1965 - present 66. Target, the (later the Abenaki) 67. Tasker Cottage 68. Thompson’s Inn 1918-1990 Chippanock 69. Titus Browns Inn 1810 70. Upper Bartlett House 1854- 71. Villager, the 1972-present 72. Wayside Inn of Sam Stillings 73. William Whites Tavern 74. Willow Cottage Inn 1910-1925 75. Woodbine Cottage 76. Woodshed (the) Fosey's Roadhouse 1920-1971 The current Mountain Home Cabins originated in the early 19th century, probably as a stage stop. It was originally part of the Stillings family land It became the property of James and Emeline Nute They sold the business to Clifton and Lucille Garland. The cabins were built two per year starting in 1931. In the 1920's, before the cabins, it operated as a campground. Cabins being a seasonal operation allowed Lucille to be a school teacher in Bartlett and Clifton tended milking cows. The property continues to be operated by Clifton's grand children who also operate Bear Notch Ski Touring Company from the site. Source Material from "The Latchstring Was Always Out" by Aileen Carroll, 1994 The establishments we know of are divided by which parts of town they were located in. Choose from the links shown below: Upper Village Area Intervale Area Glen Area As early as the mid 1800's entrepreneurs even endeavored to place hotels atop mountains. There were more than one. This one was atop Mount Washington. It burned in 1870, was rebuilt and burned again in 1908. Upper Village Area Intervale Area Glen Area Historic Lodging Map

  • HOW PLACES GOT THEIR NAMES | bartletthistory

    How Places Around Bartlett Got Their Names ​ History, tragedy, and whimsy determined what we call these White Mountain peaks: REFERENCE: By Mark Bushnell AMC Outdoors, November/December 2011 Note: The editor originally posted a link to the original article. That link has since disappeared. The news shocked Nancy Barton: Her fiance had left. She decided to follow him, despite the biting cold on that December day in 1778. Nancy set out on foot from the estate of Col. Joseph Whipple in Dartmouth (since renamed Jefferson), N.H., where she and her fiancé, Jim Swindell, worked. She intended to make the more-than-100-mile trek to Portsmouth, where Jim had supposedly gone. One version of the story says Jim had taken Nancy's dowry and fled. A variant of the tale casts Col. Whipple as the villain, claiming he disapproved of the match and had sent his hired hand away. Whatever the reason for Jim's disappearance, Nancy's effort to find him was ill advised. She made it as far as what is now known as Crawford Notch. A search party is said to have found her seated beside a brook, head resting upon her hand and walking stick. Her clothes, which had gotten wet when she crossed the brook, were stiff with ice. She didn't stir as the searchers approached. Nancy Barton had frozen to death. It is small consolation, but Nancy's tragic demise earned her a measure of immortality. People began referring to a nearby mountain as Mount Nancy. The name stuck. A Harvard professor in the mid-1800s suggested changing the name to Mount Amorisgelu, a combination of two Latin words meaning "the frost of love." He thought it a more poetic way to commemorate Nancy Barton's fate. But that mouthful of a name never supplanted Mount Nancy. Over the years, "Mount Nancy" took the same path to acceptance as the names of most peaks in the White Mountains. It began as a locally known designation. The name gained some renown when it was printed in an early book, the travel writings of the Rev. Timothy Dwight, printed in 1823. Then it was accepted by the Appalachian Mountain Club's Committee on Nomenclature , which was created to standardize names and settle disputes. Lastly, it won approval from the U.S. Board of Geographic Names (USBGN ) , the nation's final arbiter on place names since 1890. Indian Terms: American Indians were of course the first to name the White Mountains. During the millennia before Europeans conquered the region, the local people bestowed names on significant landscape features. Most of those names, sadly, have been lost. The ones we still know are descriptive. Mount Waumbek,, for example, seemingly derives its name from the word "waumbekket-methna," meaning "snowing mountains" in some local Indian dialects, from "waumbek-methna," sometimes translated as "mountains with snowy foreheads," or from "waumbik," meaning "white rocks" in Algonquin. It is not unusual for the precise derivation to be ambiguous. For example, Mahoosuc Mountain's name might come from an Abenaki word meaning "home of hungry animals" or a Natick word for "pinnacle." Among the most debated origins is that of Mount Kearsarge —a name so popular that the White Mountains have two, one now known as Kearsarge North to reduce confusion. Kearsarge may come from an Algonquin word meaning "born of the hill that first shakes hands with the dawn," a long, lyrical sentiment for one word. Or perhaps it derives from an Abenaki word meaning simply "pointed mountain." Another theory holds that it owes its name to the contraction of the name of an early white settler, Hezekiah Sargent. Say it several times fast and you can almost hear it. Many of the surviving mountain names that sound like American Indian terms honor individual chiefs. But white settlers bestowed those names after the tribes of the White Mountains were overwhelmed by disease and warfare. In that sense, these names bear a more tragic legacy even than Mount Nancy. Among the Indians honored are Chocorua (who, after a dispute with settlers in the early 1700s, was either killed or committed suicide on the mountain that now bears his name), Kancamagus (who, after failing to make peace with the English, led a raid on the town of Dover in 1686, then fled to Canada), and Waternomee (who was killed during a massacre in 1712). The fad of naming mountains after past Indian leaders grew so popular that two White Mountains even honor chiefs from far-off tribes—Osceola, a Seminole who lived in the Everglades, and Tecumseh, a Shawnee who lived in Ohio. The Presidents: White settlers more typically named mountains after white leaders. That's what a group of seven men from the town of Lancaster, N.H., set out to do on July 31, 1820. They wanted to put some names on the map, perhaps knowing that once in print, a name was often picked up by later mapmakers and guidebook writers. So it was no coincidence that they brought along mapmaker Philip Carrigain, an important cartographer who would eventually get his own mountain. The naming party climbed Mount Washington, which was named for George Washington in 1784 for his military actions during the Revolution—he wasn't yet president. By the time the Lancaster men climbed the mountain, however, the former president was the sainted father of the country. They thought his peak deserved august company. That day they picked out appropriate prominences for the most prominent men of the day. With Carrigain's help, they honored John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe with mountains. But the naming party still had mountains it wanted to name, so it added one for Benjamin Franklin—this being 1820, they had run out of presidents. They also named a nearby pinnacle Mount Pleasant, having apparently run out of better ideas. More Presidents have since been added to the range. The USBGN supported a push to change the name of Mount Pleasant to Mount Eisenhower in 1970, shortly after the death of the former general and president. The Presidentials also include John Quincy Adams and Franklin Pierce, who got in because he was a New Hampshire native. (Some people still know the peak by its former name, Mount Clinton, after Dewitt Clinton, an important New York politician of the early 1800s.) In 2003, the New Hampshire legislature tried to add another president to the range, voting to change Mount Clay, named for 19th century statesman Henry Clay, to Mount Reagan. But the USBGN voted to keep the former name. In 2010, a peak in the Presidentials named simply Adams 4 was renamed Mount Abigail Adams to honor her life as wife and vital private counsel to John Adams. She was, of course, also the mother of John Quincy Adams. Other presidents—both great and not so great—have been honored with mountain names elsewhere in the Whites. They are: Abraham Lincoln, James Garfield (who was honored shortly after—and presumably because of—his assassination), Grover Cleveland (he summered nearby), and Calvin Coolidge (perhaps because, as a native Vermonter, he was a New Englander). Some people might think Mount Jackson should be added to the list, but that summit is named not for Andrew, the sixth president, but for Charles Thomas Jackson, a New Hampshire state geologist who conducted research in the Presidentials. Local Heroes: Perhaps it is appropriate that many of the summits honor people of local rather than national renown. Among the locally prominent people celebrated are Thomas Starr King (a Unitarian minister and early proponent of tourism in the region, who wrote about the Whites in purple prose), Arnold Henri Guyot (a Princeton geology professor who had a mountain named after him by AMC to recognize his extensive research throughout the Appalachians), and Ezra Carter (a physician from Concord, N.H., who explored the mountains for medicinal herbs). Entire families whose lives were entwined with the mountains have also been honored. Mount Pickering got its name from a family that included Charles, a naturalist who climbed Mount Washington in 1826, and his nephews, Edward and William, both astronomers who shared their uncle's passion for mountains. Edward Pickering helped organize AMC and became its first president. For generations, the Weeks family was prominent in the Whites. One John W. Weeks was a member of the 1820 party that first named the Presidentials; a descendent of the same name was a congressman and Coolidge administration official who crafted the Weeks Act of 1911, which led to the creation of the White Mountain National Forest. Mount Weeks, previously known by the rather dull name Round Mountain, honors the family. Perhaps the most celebrated family is the Crawfords . Abel Crawford and his sons Tom and Ethan Allen Crawford were early innkeepers and helped open the region by cutting trails through the wilderness, including the bridle path up Mount Washington, still in use today as a hiking trail and considered the oldest continuously maintained footpath in the United States. Ethan's wife, Lucy, helped run the inn and published an important history of the White Mountains in 1846. Today the family name adorns several prominent geographical features, including Crawford Notch and Mount Crawford. Mount Tom is named for Tom Crawford. Other innkeepers have also been honored. Mount Hayes is named for Margaret Hayes, who ran the White Mountain Station House starting in 1851, while Mount Oscar is named for Oscar Barron, who managed the Fabyan House. At least one guest also had a summit named after him. Tom Crawford named Mount Willard as a tribute to climbing companion Joseph Willard. Crawford was being magnanimous. That mountain had previously been known as Mount Tom. More than 30 years later, a second Mount Tom, the one that remains today, was christened. F eatures and Events: But not all White Mountains were named after people. Some were named by referring to a distinctive characteristic of the peak. Thus we have such obvious name origins as Long Mountain, Table Mountain, Stairs Mountain, Mount Tripyramid, and even Old Speck, whose rock is speckled. Mining activity gave us Tin Mountain and Iron Mountain. Hurricane Mountain and Mount Mist are named for weather conditions, and Eagle, Wildcat, and Rattlesnake mountains for one-time inhabitants. If most people seemed to prefer stately names like Mount Washington, some of the mountains' namers preferred to bring a bit of whimsy to the task. So it was that we got names like Old Speck or, better yet, Goback Mountain, an apparent reference to what hikers decided to do when they saw its steepness. Or Tumbledown-Dick Mountain, which has puzzled mountain etymologists for generations. Some suggest the origin is clear: It was named when someone named Dick took a memorable fall. Others believe it comes from an Anglicization of an Indian name, the meaning of which we have lost. Perhaps the oddest name in the Whites, or at least the one memorializing the most trivial-seeming event, is Mount Mitten, which supposedly got its name after an early visitor lost his mitten while hiking there. But we can let that name stand. According to Lucy Crawford, that visitor was Timothy Nash, who lost the mitten in 1771 while climbing a tree to get a better view. Nash, who was tracking a moose that day, noticed a notch in the mountains. Perhaps he noticed the notch from the tree that claimed his mitten. Nash's discovery sparked interest. New Hampshire's governor promised a land grant if Nash could prove a horse could travel through the notch. Nash and a companion, Benjamin Sawyer, did just that. The notch became a vital route that opened the White Mountains to settlement and made trade easier between Maine and points west. The notch isn't named after Nash. That honor went to the Crawfords, who built and ran a hotel there, on the site of what is now AMC's Highland Center. And no White Mountain has been named for Nash, though he did get his land grant, and a mountain named after his missing mitten. MOSES SWEETSER 1875 Moses Sweetser, 1875, Offers His Opinions and Idea of Place Names Moses Sweetser, in his 1875 "The White Mountains, a handbook for travelers; A Guide to the Peaks" , offers up a less than flattering opinion of the nomenclature of the Mountain names. Partial text Quoted directly from Chapter 6 - Nomenclature: Men of culture have mourned for many years the absurd and meaningless originations and associations of the names of the White Mountains. Beginning with a misnomer in the title of the whole range, they descend through various grades of infelicity and awkwardness to the last names imposed in the summers of 1874 - 75. The confused jumble of titles of the main peaks suggests the society of the Federal City and the red-tape and maneuvering of politics and diplomacy, rather than the majesty of the natural altars of New England and the Franconian summits are not more fortunate. The minor mountains are for the most part named after the farmers who lived near them , or the hunters who frequented their forests. The names in themselves are usually ignoble, and it may be questioned whether the avocations of a mountain-farmer or a beaver trapper are sufficiently noble or so tend to produce high characters as to call for such honors as these Other peaks commemorate in their names certain marked physical productions or resemblances, and this is certainly a desireable mode of bestowing titles. But, the farmers who christened them were men of narrow horizons and starved imaginations, scarce knowing of the world's existence beyond their obscure valleys, and so we find scores of mountains bearing similar names, and often within sight of each another. Others were christened in memory of puerile incidents in the lives of unknown and little men, or of dull legends of recent origin. Some were named after popular landlords and railroad men; some after famous foreign peaks; and some have the titles of the towns in which they stand. Others bear resonant Indian names, the only natural outgrowth of the soil and the only fitting appellations for the higher peaks. ​ After a brief and superficial study of maps, the Editor has selected the following series of names now applied to some of the mountains in and near this region, to show at once their poverty and the confusion resultant upon their frequent duplication. . The names of hunters and settlers are preserved on Mts Stinson, Carr, Webster's Slide, Glines, Tom, Crawford, Russell, Hatch, Hix, Bickford, Lyman, Eastman, Snow's, Royce, Carter, Hight, Morse, Orne, Ingalls, Smarts, Kinsman, Big and Little Coolidge, Cushman, Fisher, Morgan, Willey, Parker, Pickering, Sawyer, Gardner, and Hunt. Probably hundreds of names in Western Maine have similar origins. There are summits named for Bill Smith, Bill Merrill and Molly Ockett and Western Maine has an Aunt Hepsy Brown Mountain. Further north where the lumbermen abound there are mountains whose popular names are so vile as to be omitted from the maps. Other groups of names are Cow, Horse, Sheep, Bull, Wildcat, Caribou,Moose, Deer, Rattlesnake, Sable, Bear, Eagle, Iron, Tin, Ore, Pine, Spruce, Beech, Oak, Cedar, Cherry and Blueberry. Some early legend or simple incident connected with them gave rise to the names Resolution, Pilot, Mitten, Cuba, Sunday, Nancy. The following names are inexplicable; Puzzle, Silver Springs, Umpire, Goose Eye, Patience, Sloop (or Slope), Thorn, Young. The last nomenclature degradation is found in the various Hog Back Mountains and in the villainous names given to the fine peaks of the Ossipee Range, which are called the Black Snouts by the neighboring rustics. A fruitfull source of confusion is the frequent duplication of names on neighboring mountains. Sometimes the same mountain has a different name depending on from where it is viewed. Out of this blind maze of hackneyed and homely names must arise the significant nomenclature of the future. This renaming must by necessity be a slow process but it has already commenced well, and by the second centennial the entire nomenclature of our New England Highlands may be reformed. Full Text available free: "The White Mountains: a handbook for travellers : a guide to the peaks" ... By Moses Foster Sweetser Chapter 6 - Nomenclature begins on page 29; click this link: Available at Google Books History of Carroll County NH " History of Carroll County NH " by Georgia Drew Merrill Published 1889. Ms. Merrill devotes Chapter XIV to how various Carroll County places got their names, beginning on page 101 . This link to the book and the page is provided here ; but you are cautioned that oft times links to external locations are sometimes changed and no longer accurate. A Google search for the book should provide the accurate link. And Now You Know And Now You Know ! Submitted by Anna Hatch Peare of Conway, NH thank you. ​ Native American Place Names: The Native Americans of this region loved the land and were close observers of nature. They gave names to the mountains, rivers, streams, and other natural features and for the most part early European settlers kept them. Today, many places we love in New Hampshire bear the names first given to them by Native Americans. Here are just a few: Amonoosuc River ('manosek) – Western Abenaki for "fishing place." Amoskeag Falls (namaskik) – Western Abenaki for "at the fish land." Contoocook River (nikn tekw ok) – Abenaki for "to or from the head or first branch of the river." Grand Monadnock (minoria denak) – Abenaki for "the bare or smooth mountain." Kearsarge (g'wizawajo) – Western Abenaki for "rough mountain." Massabesic Lake (massa nbes ek) – Abenaki for "to the great pond." Merrimack River (mol dema) – Abenaki for "deep water or river." Mount Pisgah (pisga) – Abenaki for "dark." Nashua (niswa) – Abenaki for "two." Newichwannock River (n'wijonoanek) also known today as Salmon River – Abenaki for the "long rapids and falls." Piscataqua River (pesgatak was) – Abenaki for "the water looks dark." Pemigewasset River (pamijoassek) – Abenaki for "the river having its course through here." Saco (soko) is Abenaki for "towards the south" – (msoakwtegw) Western Abenaki for "dry wood river." Sunapee Lake (seninebi) – Abenaki for "rock or mountain water." Suncook River (seni kok) – Abenaki for "to the rocks." Umbagog Lake (w'mbagwog) – Abenaki for "to the clear water lake." Winichahanat (wiwnijoanek) also known as Dover – Abenaki for "the place where the water flows around it." Lake Winnipesaukee (wiwninbesaki) – Abenaki for "the lake between or around land or islands." Souhegan River (zawhigen) is Western Abenaki for "a coming out place." Note: The references for Abenaki place names are from the following publications: "Abenaki Indian Legends, Grammar, and Place Names" by Henry Lorne Masta, 1932. "A Western Abenaki Dictionary" by Gordon M. Day, 1994. Joseph Laurent and Abenaki languages More about the Abenaki Indians, Life and Culture: ​ https://www.bartletthistory.org/bartletthistory/beginnings.html#culture ​ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abenaki_Indian_Shop_and_Camp ​ A HISTORY OF CONWAY, NEW HAMPSHIRE FOR USE IN THE SOCIAL STUDIES PROGRAM OF THE FOURTH GRADES IN THE CONWAY SCHOOL DISTRICT by BARBARA SMART LUCY ​ List of place names of Native American origin in New England ​ ​

  • Aerial Photos 1952 | bartletthistory

    1952 Aerial Photos (Some are later Dates and are so noted in the description area) ​ Bartlett Village Area, Glen, Intervale, Kearsarge and a few of jackson Flip through the collection using the arrows on each side of the photo. Hoover mouse cursor over photo to see a brief description under photo. Recommended for desktop computers. ​ Photos courtesy of Alan Eliason and unknown airplane pilot. Out of gallery ​

  • Scotty's Railroad Quiz | bartletthistory

    Scotty's Railroad Quiz I will post questions and put the answers up on November 25th if you think you know the answers write your response in the form below. Q: When the Rail line was built from Portland, ME to Fabyans, there was a section of the most "ugly ground" Where do you think that was? Q: How does the building of the Railroad through Bartlett connect to the most haunted cemetery in the state of Maine? Q: What Bridge was built half iron and half wood and stayed that way until 1884? Q Who was John Alfred Vials? Q: What kind of drills were used to bore into the granite through Crawford Notch? Give Scotty Your Answers Click Here to Send Thanks for submitting!

  • Howard Bartlett Hotel Cave Mtn House | bartletthistory

    The Cave Mountain House The Howard Hotel The Bartlett Hotel First Hotel on This Site: The Cave Mountain House THE CAVE MOUNTAIN HOUSE: 1890 - 1905 was originally the summer home of one of the Jose brothers, owners of Bartlett Land and Lumber Company. The Hotel was purchased by Edgar Stevens in 1892. His specialty was entertaining the guests both at the Inn and with excursions through the mountains. Mr Stevens was a fabulous story-teller and enjoyed personally escorting his guests on wild rides through the mountains. The Inn's rooms were advertised as large and airy, with electric lights, hot and cold running water, and excellent views from most rooms. There was also a large farm connected with the hotel that provided fresh eggs, meat and vegetables. All this could be had for prices ranging from $7 to $12 per week. (in perspective, an average family earned about $35./ month in 1895) . On May 1, 1905 the Cave Mountain House and barn were totally destroyed by fire caused by a defective chimney. The insured loss amounted to $10,875. The site remained empty until 1912 when the Howard Hotel was built on the same site. EDGAR AUGUSTUS STEVENS, proprietor of the Cave Mountain House at Bartlett, was born December 16, 1844, in Shelburne, N. H. . Edgar A. Stevens obtained his education in the common schools of Shelburne, after which he assisted his father on the farm until after the breaking out of the Civil War. Enlisting in 1863 in Company A, Eleventh Maine Volunteer Infantry, which was subsequently a part of the Twenty-fourth Army Corps, he participated in the battle of Ball's Bluff, the engagement at Hatcher's Run, where he was wounded in the foot, and at the siege of Richmond. He was honorably discharged from the service in 1866 as Orderly Sergeant. ​ During the next three years Mr. Stevens was employed in a saw-mill at Berlin, N.H., and was later fireman for two years on the Grand Trunk Railroad. position on the Portland & Ogdensburg Rail Accepting in 1871 a similar road, he was employed as fireman until 1873, when he was promoted to the position of engineer, which he retained for twenty-one years. ​ Coming to Bartlett in 1892, he purchased the Cave Mountain House, a small hotel containing but twelve rooms. This he has enlarged to a house of thirty-four rooms, with good accommodations for fifty guests, and has further improved it by putting in steam heat and electric lights. A pleasant host, attentive and accommodating, he has won an excellent patronage, many people of note visiting the house each summer, among whom may be mentioned Edward Everett Hale and family, the Rev. Mr. White, of Brookline, Mass., the Rev. Mr. Fay, of Brooklyn, N.Y., and numerous others. Mr. Stevens was a member of Ossola Lodge, I. O. O. F., in which he has held all the chairs; of Grant Post, No. 91, G. A. R., of Glen, which he has served as Commander; and of the Masonic order, in Fraternally, in which he has taken the thirty-second degree. ​ In 1873, Mr. Stevens married Abbie T. Lewis, of Conway, and they had two children, namely: Bertha May, born November 12, 1879, who is a student in Wellesley College; and Blanche Louise , born May 1881, a graduate of Brewster Academy, who is now fitting herself for the profession of a music teacher. The Howard Hotel The Howard Hotel Circa 1912 The Cave Mountain House burned in 1905 and was rebuilt as The Howard Hotel. Owned by G.K. Howard and managed by William Irish it opened on July 1, 1912. It was a first class hotel in its prime. Every room on the second and third floor connected with a bathroom, hot and cold water, and a room telephone to the front desk. The dining room seated 75 people. It provided drivers. The Howard enjoyed a long successful life and by the 1930's the rates started at $5.00 per day and $25.00 per week. These rates put it on a par with most of the other first class hotels in the area. See the original 1912 sales brochure for the Howard Hotel Below In December 1947 The hotel was purchased by Matt Elliot and Reland T. Hart and renamed the Bartlett Hotel. Matt operated the Hotel until his death in 1985. Considering Matt was there for 38 years there is scant information about him. In 1985 the Hotel was purchased by the Arthur and Chip Yannone of Brockton Massachusetts. They began a renovation of the hotel but in the winter of 1989 the Hotel was destroyed by fire caused while thawing frozen pipes. Source credit: The Latchstring was Always Out Aileen M. Carroll - 1994 ​ Photo Below is G.K. Howard; Photo at right shows Mr. Howard and John O'Connell Granville K. Howard, Prominent Bartlett Resident Dies In the passing of Granville K. Howard on Nov. 17, 1949, at his home after a brief illness, Bartlett has lost one of its outstanding citizens. Born in Hartford, Vt., in 1864, he was graduated from Dartmouth in the class of 1886 and always kept up his interests in the activities of the college. In 1887 he married Nellie Bailey of Landgrove, Vt ., and two years later he moved to Bartlett. From that time until his retirement in 1946 he was active in business, conducting a general store. In 1912 he built the Howard Hotel, which is now known as Bartlett Hotel. Mr. Howard held many town offices, having served as selectman and as a member of the school board. He was instrumental in forming the Bartlett Water Precinct of which he was treasurer for 51 years. Always interested in the welfare of the town, one of his last acts was to give a plot of land opposite the hotel for a public park. For many years he was active in Osceola Lodge, I. O. O. F., and was recently awarded his 50 year pin. His counsel and guidance will be missed by the many people who always found him a friend in time of need. Funeral services were held on Sunday, Nov. 20 at 2 p.m. at the Bartlett Congregational Church.- The Reporter, Thursday, November 24, 1949 -pg 1 The Howard Sales Brochure Opening July 1, 1912 The Howard - Circa 1930's The Bartlett Hotel Bartlett Hotel Circa 1970 Bartlett Hotel Circa 1950 Aftermath - March 1989 - Fire started at the left side from thawing frozen pipes. Hebert's Seafood Restaurant had been in the building for only a year or two. Sources: Incidents in White Mountain history - by Rev. Benjamin G. Willey https://www.ancestry.com › genealogy › records › levi-chubbuck_91882748 "The History of Carroll County", 1889, Georgia Drew Merrill brooklyncentre.com › trees › getperson Bartlett NH - In the Valley of the Saco - Aileen Carroll - 1990 Lucy Crawford's History of the White Mountains - circa 1860 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF The State of New Hampshire • BOSTON - NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 15 COURT SQUARE 1902

  • Rolling Stock | bartletthistory

    Rolling Stock of the P&O and Maine Central The term rolling stock in the rail transport industry refers to railway vehicles , including both powered and un-powered vehicles, for example locomotives , railroad cars , coaches , private railroad cars and wagons . The Big Pigs - Mallett Locomotives Mallett Pigs The Railroads Carry the Mail - Mail Cars Rolling Post Offices zz

  • Obituaries | bartlett nh history

    Share Obituaries We have compiled a number of obituaries for some of the folks who lived in Bartlett. The section has become larger than originally conceived and as a result you may have to scroll through the listings to find the one you seek. (The link opens in a new window) Browse the Obituaries

  • Hall Ancestry | bartletthistory

    Hall Ancestry Find More About Obed Hall in our "Early Settlers Section: OBED HALL ET AL John Hall, the immigrant ancestor, HALL was, according to his own deposition, born in 1617. He first appears in New England in Charlestown, where he was made a freeman May 6, 1635. He removed to Dover , New Hampshire, where his name appears on the tax list from 1648-49 until 1677, and often in land records. In 1652 he lived at Dover Neck, next to the meeting house, the lot on the southwesterly side which reached to the river and embraced a spring which is still flowing and is called Hall's spring. He was first deacon of the First Church of Dover as early as 1655. He was lot-layer as early as 1657 and as late as 1674. In 1658-59 he was one of three to lay out the town bounds between Lamprey and Newichawannock rivers , and to run the north boundary. In 1663 he was on a committee to lay out the highway from Lamprey river to the waterside. He was selectman in 1660, and was occasionally "commissioner to end small causes;" grand juror in 1663-66 and 68: "clerk of ye writs" for the court in 1663-68 and 69; town clerk in 1670-75-79 and other years. In 1677 Deacon Hall received a lot of twenty acres on the west side of Back river, which had been laid out to George Webb in 1642. He gave to his son Ralph by deed February 1. 1685-86, one-half the house and land, and the other half at his death, this deed was proved as his will May 4, 1692, and recorded February, 1694-95. He married Elizabeth . Children: 1. Sheba , baptized January 9, 1639-40. 2. John, born in Charlestown, September 21, 1645. representative to the New Hampshire legislature, 1694-95-96; died 1697. 3. Elizabeth , born September 4, 1647, died young. 4. Elizabeth , born November 2, 1648, died young. 5. Nathaniel , taxed in 1680. 6. Ralph, mentioned below. 7. Grace (?) , born May 16, 1663-64. ​ (II) Ralph Hall, son of John Hall (1). was heir to his father's homestead at Dover's Neck. July 11, 1694, he lost twenty acres of land at Fresh creek in a lawsuit with Richard Waldron. Richard and Elizabeth Pinkham gave him a quitclaim deed to land in consideration of the sum of ten pounds. He was auditor in 1702 and constable in 1705. He died November 13, 1706. He married (second). May 26, 1701, Mary Chesley, daughter of Philip Chesley. In 1713 she, with her sister Esther, wife of John Hall , quitclaimed their father's plantation at Oyster river. She married (second), February 26, 1717-18, John Fox, and quitclaimed her share in the estate of her first husband, to John Hall, son of the first wife. Ralph. John and James Hall were administrators of the estate of their father Ralph, March 4, 1706-07. The estate was divided between seven sons, the eldest getting a double portion, and fifteen pounds to Jonathan who was "weak and sick." Children of the first wife: 1. John, born about 1685. settled in Somersworth, New Hampshire, married, August 9, 1705, Esther Chesley, sister of his stepmother. 2. James, died before 1735. 3. Jonathan . 4. Isaac, removed to Massachusetts. Children of the second wife: 5. Benjamin, born June, 1702. 6. Ralph , born about 1704, married Elizabeth Willey , of Lee, New Hampshire. 7. Joseph, born March 26, 1706. mentioned below. ​ (III) Joseph Hall, son of Ralph Hall (2), was born at Dover, New Hampshire, March 26, 1706, and died November 14, 1782. He married, December 19, 1734, Peniel Bean . Children: 1. Anna , baptized July 29, 1735, married (first) Reuben Daniels , of Wolfsboro ; (second) Philip Kelley, of Wakefield . 2. Mary, baptized May 23, 1736, married Paul Hessey , and had four children. 3. Joseph, baptized November 5, 1738, mentioned below. 4. Daniel, baptized August 22, 1742, resided at Wakefield . and married widow Patience Taylor , of Sanbornton, New Hampshire. 5. Abigail, baptized October 7, 1744. 6. Samuel, baptized March 19, 1748. 7. Hannah, baptized April 2, 1749, married (second) Reuben Long. 8. John , baptized November 2, 1752. 9. Peniel, married, March 19, 1775. John Scribner , of Wakefield. IV) Joseph Hall, son of Joseph Hall (3) , was baptized November 5, 1738, and resided at Bartlett, New Hampshire. According to the federal census of 1790, Joseph Hall was the head of the only family of this name in the town of Bartlett. He was in the Revolution in Captain Joseph Parsons' company. Children: 1. Joseph, born about 1760. 2. Dorcas. 3. Nathan. 4. Betsey. 5. Rev. Elias, mentioned below. 6. Josiah. 7. Polly. 8. Benjamin. ​ (V) Rev. Elias Hall, son of Joseph Hall (4), was born at Falmouth. (Portland), Maine. August 16, 1777, and died at Jefferson, New Hampshire, October 16, 1851. He removed to Bartlett, New Hampshire, when young and was educated there in the district schools, and studied for the ministry in the Free Baptist denomination and was settled in Bartlett for many years. He married (first), about 1798, Hannah, daughter of Richard Tina, who died April 29, 1801, aged twenty-nine years. He married (second) Polly Hubbard, who died at Bartlett. February 5, 1813, aged twenty-eight years. He married (third) Hannah Seavey, born April 22, 1790, died August 26, 1839, daughter of Joseph and Abigail (Cummings) Seavey, of Bartlett. He married (fourth) Sarah (Mead) Chase, widow. Elias Hall removed to Shapleigh. Maine, where he preached in the Free Baptist church. As a preacher he stood in the foremost ranks of his denomination ; as a man he was kindly, sympathetic and charitable, attracting many friends ; of large heart and high character. Children of Rev. Elias Hall: 1. Samuel, born at Bartlett, December 24. 1799, died at Meredith, New Hampshire, about 1870. 2. Ivory, born at Shapleigh, Maine, February 23, 1801, mentioned below. 3. Hannah , born at Shapleigh. October 15, 1803, died at Bartlett, New Hampshire, about 1860 ; married Barzilla Emery . 4. Dorothy, born at Shapleigh, January 6, « 8on , died November, 1880: married Isaac Nute. 5. Elias Merrill , born at Bartlett, New Hampshire. .March 3, 1808, married Clarinda Stillings, and had Charles Mitchell (married Melissa Hall ), Loami, Elmira. 6. Elmira, born May 17, 1810, died 1816. 7. James Hubbard , born at Bartlett, June 16, 1812, died at Gorham, Maine, about 1870; married Sarah Ann Hall, daughter of Judge Hall, and had Betsey, Sarah Ann, Mary, and James. 8. Timothy Emerson, born June 9, 1814. died about 1818. 9. Alvah , born April 10, 1816, died at Stamford, Connecticut, June 23, 1881 ; married, at New York City, Sophia E. Pettigrew, daughter of Robert and Helen (Boistreage) Pettigrew; children: i. Sophia Virginia, married William N. Beach; ii. Ana Byrd, married Albert C. Hall; iii. Alice, married William B. Duncan ; iv. Isabel McRae . MORE ABOUT THE OBED HALL FAMILY HERE Garland Ridge Cemetery and the so-called "Hall Maple Tree". As of 2019 it is about 190 years old. MORE DETAILS: (1757-1828)HALL, Obed, a Representative from New Hampshire; born in Raynham, Bristol County, Mass., December 23, 1757; moved to Madbury, N.H., and thence to Upper Bartlett and engaged in agricultural pursuits; subsequently became an innkeeper; surveyor of highways in 1790; member of the board of selectmen 1791, 1798, 1800, 1802-1810, 1814-1819, and 1823; member of the State house of representatives in 1801 and 1802; appointed judge of the court of common pleas by Gov. John Taylor Gilman; elected as a Republican to the Twelfth Congress (March 4, 1811-March 3, 1813); member of the State senate in 1819; died in Bartlett, Carroll County, N.H., April 1, 1828; interment in Garland Ridge Cemetery, about two miles south of Bartlett; reinterment in Evergreen Cemetery, Portland, Maine.Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present. New Hamphire Post Offices and Postmasters - 1816 Obed Hall 2d is also listed as a Bartlett Postmaster in 1816 and he earned $4.34. SOURCE: Contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by Gwen Hurst - It seems Obed 1st was the uncle of this Obed. OBED HALL 2nd. 1795 -1873 Son of Hon. Ebenezer L. and Lydia (Dinsmore) Hall ; born, Conway, February 23, 1795 ; (Ebenezer was Obed 1st's brother) practiced, Bartlett and Tamworth ; died, Tamworth, May 21, 1873. In the war of 1812 Mr. Hall was in the military service for a short time, in a company of militia at Portsmouth. His early education was imperfect, and he studied law three years with Enoch Lincoln of Fryeburg, Maine, and two years with Lyman B. Walker of Meredith. He first set up in practice at Bartlett, and about 1820 changed his residence to Tamworth. He was representative in the legislature in 1840 and 1841, in which latter year he was appointed register of Probate for the new county of Carroll. That post he occupied ten years. In 1854 and 1856 he was a state senator.He was a lawyer of respectable acquirements, but preferred to give his time and attention to politics, which did not conduce to his legal progress nor to his pecuniary profit. He gave much attention to his farm, being partial to agriculture. He was public-spirited, and in private life benevolent and kindly.His first wife was Elizabeth Gilman of Tamworth, who bore him one daughter; his second was Caroline E., daughter of John Carroll of Maine. She left him a daughter, who outlived her father. SOURCE: The bench and bar of New Hampshire: including biographical notices ... By Charles Henry Bell I have an answer to the headstone question at the Garland Ridge Cemetery in Bartlett sent to me by Ruth Abbott: ​ Hannah Seavey Hall: (b 22 April 1790 d 26 August 1839) Hannah Seavey was born in Bartlett NH in 1790. She was the daughter of Joseph Seavey and Abigail Comings. Hannah was 11 years old when her mother, Abigail died. She was“brought up” by her relative .Elijah Locke Seavey (1774 - 1860) ​ Hannah married Elias Hall in 1813 (his third marriage) They had 10 sons and one daughter. She was a tall framed women with thick long brown hair. It was believed that consumption hastened her death. ​ Her grave was near a little maple tree on one side of the cemetery. The maple is no longer small after all these years. Her headstone was a plain slab that her son Dudley and Joseph put there after they were men and earning money. ​ Elijah Locke Seavey is buried nearby Hannah’s grave with both of his wives, Lucy Bassett and Mary D. Meserve Harriman. This picture was taken May 2010 courtesy of Ron Ward. This is in the Garland Ridge Cemetery in the north-west corner near the maintenance shed. This tree was "a small maple" in 1839, so it is approximately 180 years old. Too bad it couldn't tell us all the things it has seen during that time. ​ MORE DETAILS: ​ The following information was sent to me by Cheryl Hall: Subject: Mystery Question: Hannah Hall buried in Garland Ridge Cemetery Message: I hadn’t visited the Bartlett Historical Society web site in awhile so I was delighted to see that information on the Halls in Bartlett had been added to the site. After visiting Bartlett in the summer of 2007 for the purpose of genealogy research on the brothers, Obed, Ebenezer and Linus Hall, I discovered the Bartlett Historical Society on line, and I have been a member since that time. Over time I have had several excellent email conversations with Marcia Dolley and I have been delighted by the wonderful gifts of information that she has provided. ​ There were two distinct Hall families in Bartlett. Joseph Hall, who appears in the 1790 census for Bartlett was a descendant of John Hall of Dover, NH (for which you have the Hall Ancestry posted). Obed Hall who also appears in the 1790 census for Bartlett was a descendant of Edward Hal l of Rehoboth, MA (I’ll see if I can put something together for you). Although some Hall researchers suspect that it could be possible, there is absolutely no proof that these two Hall families were related. ​ When I visited Bartlett in 2007, I spent a fair amount of time at the Garland Ridge Cemetery viewing the headstones of the two Hall families buried there. I also found Hannah’s headstone and took a photo of it. I read the headstone as follows: ​ Hannah wife of Elias Hall died Aug 26, 1839 AE 49 yrs ​ Hannah was the third wife of Rev. Elias Hall. She was Hannah Seavey, daughter of Joseph and Abigail (Cummings) Seavey, of Bartlett. Hannah would have been born in 1790. Research that I have found online since my visit to Bartlett supports that Hannah Seavey was the wife of Elias Hall, and that she died in 1839, not 1830. ​ It was their son, (not Obed Hall’s son) Joseph Seavey) Hall who was instrumental in the building of the first Summit House on Mt. Washington in 1852. ​ See: http://www.bartletthistory.org/bartletthistory/lodgingvillage.html#obedhall ​ Thanks for providing such a great, and informative, web site! I look forward to additional family information appearing on your site as it becomes available. Also found Roland Hall is living in Keene and that particular branch of Halls' originally came to Bartlett from Maine and are not related to the earlier Halls' of Bartlett. ​ OTHER INFORMATION IN THIS WEBSITE: Obed Hall's Tavern ; (1757-1828)HALL, Obed Joseph Seavey Hall of Bartlett was one of the most important participants in mid-nineteenth century events in Crawford Notch (or the White Mountain Notch as it was known in those days) and on Mt. Washington. Yet most people have never heard of him. Read the Story at the White Mountain History web site, HERE . ​ ---------------- Find More About Obed Hall in our "Early Settlers Section: OBED HALL ET AL Sources: Incidents in White Mountain history - by Rev. Benjamin G. Willey https://www.ancestry.com › genealogy › records › levi-chubbuck_91882748 "The History of Carroll County", 1889, Georgia Drew Merrill brooklyncentre.com › trees › getperson Bartlett NH - In the Valley of the Saco - Aileen Carroll - 1990 Lucy Crawford's History of the White Mountains - circa 1860 REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS OF The State of New Hampshire • BOSTON - NEW ENGLAND HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 15 COURT SQUARE 1902

  • Ski Areas in Bartlett nh | bartlett nh history

    Bartlett Ski Areas past and present This Newsletter features the ski areas that have been, or still are, located in Bartlett. Scroll down to page 6 where the article begins. The Link will open in a new window. Ski Areas in Bartlett We are working on this page.

  • West Side Road | bartletthistory

    West Side Road Rick Garon ‎ sent us this information about his Great Great Grandmother who lived on the West Side Road in the 1850's. His description below: "Don't know if this means anything, but these are picture of my great great grandmother, Mary Abigail Cook Drown, born in Porter, Maine in 1830 to William Cook and Abigail Bickford. She was the wife of Samuel William Drown. She died in 1923. One picture was taken of the house on West Side Road. Don't know who the child is. possibly my grandmother who was born in 1902. But there were other children of that age in the family at that time. Notice her house on the maps that you posted." Upper Bartlett Glen Area Cooks Crossing Goodrich Falls Jericho Intervale Dundee West Side Road A bit fuzzy but readable if you put on your specs. Mary Abigail and husband, Sam, are buried in the Hilltown Cemetery on West Side Road. Sam's headstone is readable while Mary's is probably one that has faded away. The Hilltown area on the West Side Road remains only in memories. There are still one or two cellar holes to be seen and a couple of houses probably of a later vintage. The Hilltown Cemetery is a spot you drive by frequently but difficult to find. It is on the West Side Road, on the right about two miles from the Bartlett end. Look for sharp corner just before the road goes down hill to the river. There's a driveway with a bamboo patch and faint remains of an old house foundation. (Very dangerous driveway to exit...visibility very poor. May be advisable to park somewhere else nearby and walk back to the driveway) We have a few pictures taken at the Hilltown Cemetery a few years ago that can be seen at this link. ​ ​ And more information on the Hilltown area at the next page about the West Side Road. HILLTOWN CEMETERY HILLTOWN Olive Drown 1909 We bet you have never heard of the 1936 Hilltown Landslide on West Side Road. Resident Eugene Hill was killed. THE HILLTOWN SLIDE More West Side Road at this link MORE WEST SIDE ROAD Upper Bartlett Glen Area Cooks Crossing Goodrich Falls Jericho Intervale Dundee West Side Road

  • Newsletter Archives | bartlett nh history

    Past Newsletters for your perusal Share This Link Opens In a New Window Newsletters Index

  • Experimental Forest | bartlett nh history

    Bartlett Experimental Forest Bartlett Experimental Forest What's going on up in the woods? For 87 years, the Bartlett Experimental Forest has been a proving ground for almost every forestry treatment ever plausibly proposed for managing northern hardwoods. Vetting and spreading the best of these practices has been the life work of two scientists: Mariko Yamaskai and Bill Leak. Read the article at "Northern Woodlands". Northern Woodlands This We are working on this page.

  • History | Lodging Hotels Bartlett Village Area | bartlett nh history

    Hotels & Lodgings in the Village Area Page 1 ​ Upper Village Area Intervale Area Glen Area Historic Lodging Map Historic Lodging Map Hotels Loding Page 1 Continue to page 2 Continue to page 3 Cave Mountain House Share CAVE MOUNTAIN HOUSE: 1890 - 1905 (below) was originally the summer home of one of the Jose brothers , owners of Bartlett Land and Lumber Company . The Hotel was managed by one Edgar Stevens , whose specialty was entertaining the guests both at the Inn and with excursions through the mountains. Mr Stevens was a fabulous story-teller and enjoyed personally escorting his guests on wild rides through the mountains. The Inn's rooms were advertised as large and airy, with electric lights, hot and cold running water, and excellent views from most rooms. There was also a large farm connected with the hotel that provided fresh eggs, meat and vegetables. All this could be had for prices ranging from $7 to $12 per week. (in perspective, an average family earned about $35./ month in 1895). On May 1, 1905 the Cave Mountain House and barn were totally destroyed by fire caused by a defective chimney. The insured loss amounted to $10875. The site remained empty until 1912 when the Howard Hotel was built on the same site. The Cave Mountain House burned in 1905 and was rebuilt as The Howard Hotel. Owned by G.K. Howard it opened in 1912. It was a first class hotel in its prime. Every room on the second and third floor connected with a bathroom, hot and cold water, and a room telephone to the front desk. The dining room seated 75 people. It provided drivers. See the original 1912 sales brochure for the Howard Hotel HERE The hotel was eventually purchased by Matt Elliot and Realand Hart and renamed the Bartlett Hotel. Matt operated the Hotel until his death in1985 at which time it was purchased by the Yannones of Brockton Massachusetts. In the winter of 1989 the Hotel was destroyed by fire caused while thawing frozen pipes. Source credit: The Latchstring was Always Out Aileen M. Carroll The Howard Hotel The Bartlett House was built in 1856 by Franklin George , first as his residence and shortly thereafter, as the town became a stopover for travelers on their way through Crawford Notch, he operated as an Inn. (There was no railroad in 1856). During the next 15 years several additions were made and in 1872 it became known as The Bartlett House. (Not to be confused with The Upper Bartlett House which was about half a mile further west). After the railroad was constructed through the Notch Franklin leased the Mt Crawford House for a period of five years beginning in 1872. It's location directly on the railroad line was ideal. Franklin was an industrious man, laying out a bridle path to the summit of Mt Langdon, operating a building and loan association and owning vast tracts of land stretching from the Saco River to the Albany Town Line. He also established the Bartlett Water Company and found time to be a Bartlett Selectman for six terms. He served as a State Representative in 1878 and was the Town Tax Collector as late as 1890. ​ The former Bartlett House is located in the center of the Village at the blinking light. It is now the residence of Bert and Gretta George. It operated as an Inn from 1856 to 1892. Reference Material for this Tourism Section comes from: The Latchstring was Always Out by Aileen M. Carroll 1994 Historic Lodging Map Hotels Loding Page 1 Continue to page 2 Continue to page 3 The Bide-a-Wee is the second house on the left on River Street in the Village. It was operated by Charlotte and Frank Lobdell from 1920 to 1941. They catered to railroad workers and tourists alike. The Maple Cottage Owned by George Chesley from about 1920 to 1939. He could accommodate both summer boarders and auto parties. After World War 2 it was purchased by the Stoatemaiers and is currently operated as The Lawrencian Ski Club . The Woodbine Cottage was built in 1890 by Alba Charles Gray and Ida Story Gray . They had a lumber business and built this home in 1890 in Bartlett. They eventually sold the home and it was later operated by Mrs A.F. Bergeron in the 1930's. It was later occupied by Richard Jones and retains nearly all the character now as then. Upon Mr Jones death the property was willed to a group of his friends who utilize it as a vacation home. It is the second house east of the school. Just Across the street is the former Elms Inn operated by Mrya Smith and now the home of Cheryl and Richard Nealley. The building just to the east was a Sunoco Gas Station and repair shop operated by Ellwood Dinsmore from the mid 1940's to the early 1970's. OBED HALL, Early Pioneer ​ In 1790 Obed Hall's Tavern was probably located at the junction of today's Bear Notch Road and Route 302, today's park. Obed came to Bartlett from Madbury as an early Bartlett pioneer who became a prominent citizen, serving as Selectman, Town Treasurer, and was elected to Congress in 1810. In 1819 he ran for the Senate but did not win that election. Read the Hall Ancestry Here Travel at this time was hazardous and Tavern-keepers considered themselves benefactors to the traveling public rather than businessmen. Mr Hall was one of two appointed as Surveyors of Highways and he was among those who petitioned the General Court in 1793 for a tax of one penney per acre to be used for the improvement of roads within the town. Obed first married a woman 20 years his senior and second time a woman 20 years his Junior. After Obed's death his wife moved to Portland Maine and re-married to Richard O'Dell. Obed's Tavern was operated at various times by William White and Benjamin Gould. In addition to the Tavern Mr Hall also tended a large farm which was located partially on the property that is todays Sky Valley Motel. It was probably 100 acres or more. It was thought that he also operated a lodging establishment at the farm. Mr Hall's brother Ebenezer also lived in Bartlett and was a school teacher in the local school. From 1811 to 1829 he was Judge of Probate for Coos County (Joseph S. Hall was NOT related to Obed, but he was the builder of the first summit house on Mount Washington in 1852. Joseph Seavey Hall of Bartlett was one of the most important participants in mid-nineteenth century events in Crawford Notch (or the White Mountain Notch as it was known in those days) and on Mt. Washington. Yet most people have never heard of him. Read the Story at the White Mountain History web site, HERE .) Obed 1st was the uncle of this Obed. OBED HALL 2nd. 1795 -1873 Son of Hon. Ebenezer L. and Lydia (Dinsmore) Hall ; born, Conway, February 23, 1795 ; (Ebenezer was Obed 1st's brother) practiced, Bartlett and Tamworth ; died, Tamworth, May 21, 1873. In the war of 1812 Mr. Hall was in the military service for a short time, in a company of militia at Portsmouth. His early education was imperfect, and he studied law three years with Enoch Lincoln of Fryeburg, Maine, and two years with Lyman B. Walker of Meredith. He first set up in practice at Bartlett, and about 1820 changed his residence to Tamworth. He was representative in the legislature in 1840 and 1841, in which latter year he was appointed register of Probate for the new county of Carroll. That post he occupied ten years. In 1854 and 1856 he was a State Senator.He was a lawyer of respectable acquirements, but preferred to give his time and attention to politics, which did not conduce to his legal progress nor to his pecuniary profit. He gave much attention to his farm, being partial to agriculture. He was public-spirited, and in private life benevolent and kindly.His first wife was Elizabeth Gilman of Tamworth, who bore him one daughter; his second was Caroline E., daughter of John Carroll of Maine. She left him a daughter, who outlived her father. SOURCE: The bench and bar of New Hampshire: including biographical notices ... By Charles Henry Bell The Thompson's Inn is recognizable today as the Chippanock , across the street from the Post Office. It began as a private residence but by 1918 was operated as an Inn/Restaurant by Gertrude Thompson whose husband worked as a fireman on the railroad. In 1945 it was purchased by Sanford Hill who renamed it the Chippanock (bright north star). He continued to operate it until his death in the early 1990'S. Compare the two pictures below, the left picture is about 1920. The right picture is about 1950. Business must have been good to allow for the significant expansion. Silver Springs Cottage was actually a large farm operated by James and Emeline Nute ...(not to be confused with Silver Springs Lodge further west on Rte 302) Folks would come to spend the summer on a rural farm. It burned years ago but it's cellar hole is still visible just east of Mountain Home Cabins. The property was eventually inherited by Carrie LeBar , Upper Bartlett's only black resident in the 1960's, who operated the Lone Maple which was located about a half mile closer to the Village Center. It also burned in the late 1960's and has been replaced by the home of the Gerry and Eileen McManus. The current Mountain Home Cabins originated in the early 19th century, probably as a stage stop. It was originally part of the Stillings family land It became the property of James and Emeline Nute. They sold the business to Clifton and Lucille Garland . The cabins were built two per year starting in 1931. In the 1920's, before the cabins, it operated as a campground. Cabins being a seasonal operation allowed Lucille to be a school teacher in Bartlett and Clifton tended milking cows. The property continues to be operated by Clifton's grand children who also operate Bear Notch Ski Touring Company from the site Directly across the street from the Woodbine is the Willow Cottage Inn which was owned by Ralph and Elizabeth Mead . Ralph died of the influenza strain of 1918 but Elizabeth continued to operate the inn for some time after that. The house today is owned and occupied by Gary Roy. This is a photo of Orin Cook in 1945 cutting hay in the field across the street from his Maple Dale Farm House. And, Orin and Martha Cook with two unidentified children. Maple Dale was originally part of a much larger tract owned by Obed Hall . The following year Orin sold a portion of the farm to Alan and Libby Eliason who constructed the Sky Valley Cottages. Andrew and Anna Arendt operated The Maple Dale , which is now the Penguin Ski Club. Andrew died first in 1959 and Anna only stayed at Maple Dale for about three years after Andrews Death. She died some 10 years later in New York City. Burial is in the Catholic Cemetery in Bartlett. These pictures are about 1948, courtesy Alan Eliason.. The Garland Inn on Albany Avenue. built by Eben Garland about 1890. It also housed a drug store and jewelry store. It was sold to the Hodgkins family about 1920 for use as a private residence. It is still owned by the Hodgkins family. Click Pic for a large view Judith Garland Miller of Lake Helen Florida provided this information about her father, Eben Garland: (1/23/13) Editors Note: An 1890 map of Bartlett Village shows an E.O. Garland General Merchandise Store; however, this Eben was not of that branch of the family. This Eben resided in the Intervale area. Judith Garland Miller told us "He left Bartlett as a young man probably in his 20s. He married my mother in 1937 in Pennsylvania and he never mentioned anything about the 'Garland Inn'. That may be another branch of the garland family. His father was Grover Wildred Garland and his father was James Merle Garland." Now that the holidays and bustle of the season is past, thought I would get back to you and give you a little something: My father - Eben Garland - told me this soon before he passed away. He said in 1918 or 1919 maybe the winter of 1919 -1920 there was a movie made about a logging camp on his grandfather's farm. The movie stared Harold or Howard Lockwood. My father is in the movie along with his grandfather. They had an oxen driven wagon and my father was in the wagon. It was either in the Dundee or Intervale area. I cannot find out anything about this but maybe it would be something that would be in some archives or something about the area. This is all I know but maybe it could be something to look into. Thank you Judith Garland Miller If you know more about this, or anything else about Eben, tell us. 1952: The west end of Main Street showing the train yard. The Chippanock Inn and Garland's Restaurant can be seen, lower center. The Peg Mill is at top center. Continue to page 2 Upper Village Area Intervale Area Glen Area Historic Lodging Map Historic Lodging Map Upper Village Hotels Loding Page 1 Upper Village Lodging page 2 Upper Village Lodging page 3

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Bartlett, N.H. 03812